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“Beings that have existence only in ye minds of men”: State Finance and the Origins of the Collective Imagination

“Beings that have existence only in ye minds of men”: State Finance and the Origins of the... Robert Mitchell Duke University Nearly a decade ago, Robert Markley positioned "the new economic criticism" as one of the most significant recent theoretical developments in eighteenth-century studies, describing a series of now classic studies--James Thompson's Models of Value: Eighteenth-Century Political Economy of the Novel, Sandra Sherman's Finance and Fictionality in the Early Eighteenth Century: Accounting for Defoe, and Patrick Brantlinger's Fictions of State: Culture and Credit in Britain, 1694­1994--that emerged from the "current scholarly fascination with debt and credit."1 Since Markley's assessment--and no doubt assisted by the subsequent fin de siècle collapse of the dot-com and biotech speculative bubbles--scholarly fascination with debt and credit has persisted, producing a new series of studies on relationships among eighteenth-century finance, material culture, and literature. Focusing in even more depth and detail than their predecessors on the specificities of eighteenth-century finance, accounting, insurance, and monetary instruments, and often linking finance to questions of colonialism and labor, scholars of this newest wave of the new economic criticism have interrogated "Whig" modalities of emotion and affect, the postcoloniality of the eighteenth century, and epistemological structures that linked slavery, finance, and modern historicism, among other topics.2 In the spirit and wake of these recent studies http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Eighteenth Century University of Pennsylvania Press

“Beings that have existence only in ye minds of men”: State Finance and the Origins of the Collective Imagination

The Eighteenth Century , Volume 49 (2) – Nov 26, 2008

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Texas Tech University Press
ISSN
1935-0201
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Abstract

Robert Mitchell Duke University Nearly a decade ago, Robert Markley positioned "the new economic criticism" as one of the most significant recent theoretical developments in eighteenth-century studies, describing a series of now classic studies--James Thompson's Models of Value: Eighteenth-Century Political Economy of the Novel, Sandra Sherman's Finance and Fictionality in the Early Eighteenth Century: Accounting for Defoe, and Patrick Brantlinger's Fictions of State: Culture and Credit in Britain, 1694­1994--that emerged from the "current scholarly fascination with debt and credit."1 Since Markley's assessment--and no doubt assisted by the subsequent fin de siècle collapse of the dot-com and biotech speculative bubbles--scholarly fascination with debt and credit has persisted, producing a new series of studies on relationships among eighteenth-century finance, material culture, and literature. Focusing in even more depth and detail than their predecessors on the specificities of eighteenth-century finance, accounting, insurance, and monetary instruments, and often linking finance to questions of colonialism and labor, scholars of this newest wave of the new economic criticism have interrogated "Whig" modalities of emotion and affect, the postcoloniality of the eighteenth century, and epistemological structures that linked slavery, finance, and modern historicism, among other topics.2 In the spirit and wake of these recent studies

Journal

The Eighteenth CenturyUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2008

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