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As If an Enemy’s Country: The British Occupation of Boston and the Origins of Revolution (review)

As If an Enemy’s Country: The British Occupation of Boston and the Origins of Revolution (review) R EVIEWS EDITED BY ROBERT S. COX AND R AC H E L K . O N U F As If an Enemy's Country: The British Occupation of Boston and the Origins of Revolution. By Richard Archer. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. xviii, 284. Cloth, $24.95.) Reviewed by Timothy J. Shannon In this new installment in Oxford University Press's Pivotal Moments in American History series, Richard Archer examines the events surrounding the British Army's occupation of Boston between October 1768 and March 1770. For historians of the Revolutionary era, this book offers an accurate but not especially innovative retelling of familiar events. For undergraduate and lay readers, the audience that I suspect Archer is most interested in attracting, As If an Enemy's Country delivers on what are the hallmarks of the Pivotal Moments series: a well-paced narrative informed by sound archival research, illuminated by engaging anecdotes and biographical sketches, and attentive to bigger themes in American history. In that sense, this book provides a tale well told, although not likely to supplant classic works on the same topic by Bernard Bailyn, Hiller Zobel, and John Shy, and sometimes in need of closer engagement with more recent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

As If an Enemy’s Country: The British Occupation of Boston and the Origins of Revolution (review)

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

R EVIEWS EDITED BY ROBERT S. COX AND R AC H E L K . O N U F As If an Enemy's Country: The British Occupation of Boston and the Origins of Revolution. By Richard Archer. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. xviii, 284. Cloth, $24.95.) Reviewed by Timothy J. Shannon In this new installment in Oxford University Press's Pivotal Moments in American History series, Richard Archer examines the events surrounding the British Army's occupation of Boston between October 1768 and March 1770. For historians of the Revolutionary era, this book offers an accurate but not especially innovative retelling of familiar events. For undergraduate and lay readers, the audience that I suspect Archer is most interested in attracting, As If an Enemy's Country delivers on what are the hallmarks of the Pivotal Moments series: a well-paced narrative informed by sound archival research, illuminated by engaging anecdotes and biographical sketches, and attentive to bigger themes in American history. In that sense, this book provides a tale well told, although not likely to supplant classic works on the same topic by Bernard Bailyn, Hiller Zobel, and John Shy, and sometimes in need of closer engagement with more recent

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 11, 2011

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