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Andrew Jackson, Southerner by Mark Cheathem (review)

Andrew Jackson, Southerner by Mark Cheathem (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2014) 1810­1820, a period of volcanic-induced climate change that manifested itself most notably in the ``Year Without Summer'' (1816). Andrew Jackson, Southerner. By Mark Cheathem. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2013. Pp. 312. Cloth, $39.95.) Reviewed by Robert Bonner Back in 1996, the late Bertram Wyatt-Brown marked SHEAR's Nashvillebased conference with a Presidential Address on ``Andrew Jackson's Honor.'' That paper, subsequently published in the Journal of the Early Republic, forged a link between Old Hickory's dueling, Indian-fighting, and general orneriness and the traits of ``southern'' honor that so fascinated Wyatt-Brown. Mark Cheathem's new book takes a cue from Wyatt-Brown's classic piece even as he moves beyond the most clearly sensational parts of ``Old Hickory's'' career (there were many) so as to apply the ``southern honor theme'' to the entire life of this seminal political figure. If Jackson has often been treated as a ``representative of the trans-Appalachian frontier,'' Cheathem insists that a Waxhaw upbringing and a subsequent Tennessee political apprenticeship made him ``truly a southerner'' (4). His political appeal across the slaveholding states thereby can be seen as a function of Jackson's ``southern identity,'' as evidenced in his well-known ``propensity toward http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Andrew Jackson, Southerner by Mark Cheathem (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (3) – Aug 12, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2014) 1810­1820, a period of volcanic-induced climate change that manifested itself most notably in the ``Year Without Summer'' (1816). Andrew Jackson, Southerner. By Mark Cheathem. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2013. Pp. 312. Cloth, $39.95.) Reviewed by Robert Bonner Back in 1996, the late Bertram Wyatt-Brown marked SHEAR's Nashvillebased conference with a Presidential Address on ``Andrew Jackson's Honor.'' That paper, subsequently published in the Journal of the Early Republic, forged a link between Old Hickory's dueling, Indian-fighting, and general orneriness and the traits of ``southern'' honor that so fascinated Wyatt-Brown. Mark Cheathem's new book takes a cue from Wyatt-Brown's classic piece even as he moves beyond the most clearly sensational parts of ``Old Hickory's'' career (there were many) so as to apply the ``southern honor theme'' to the entire life of this seminal political figure. If Jackson has often been treated as a ``representative of the trans-Appalachian frontier,'' Cheathem insists that a Waxhaw upbringing and a subsequent Tennessee political apprenticeship made him ``truly a southerner'' (4). His political appeal across the slaveholding states thereby can be seen as a function of Jackson's ``southern identity,'' as evidenced in his well-known ``propensity toward

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 12, 2014

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