An American Science of Feeling: Harvard’s Psychology of Emotion during the World War I Era

An American Science of Feeling: Harvard’s Psychology of Emotion during the World War I Era Abstract: American psychologists at the turn of the twentieth century recognized their deficient understanding of emotion. This self-assessment did not deflect the majority from learning experiments reported in parsimonious language. Psychologists affiliated with Harvard University before and after World War I, however, were exceptional. The Harvard scholars applied the synthesizing habit of inherited philosophy to the new science of psychology. More comfortable with inference and generalization than their peers, they emphasized purposeful behavior, social relationships, and dynamic transformation. Affective experience was inseparable from this analysis. Nonetheless, their marginal status and holistic approach drew them toward extreme positions, most notably eugenics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the History of Ideas University of Pennsylvania Press

An American Science of Feeling: Harvard’s Psychology of Emotion during the World War I Era

Journal of the History of Ideas, Volume 73 (3) – Jul 23, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Journal of the History of Ideas, Inc.
ISSN
1086-3222
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: American psychologists at the turn of the twentieth century recognized their deficient understanding of emotion. This self-assessment did not deflect the majority from learning experiments reported in parsimonious language. Psychologists affiliated with Harvard University before and after World War I, however, were exceptional. The Harvard scholars applied the synthesizing habit of inherited philosophy to the new science of psychology. More comfortable with inference and generalization than their peers, they emphasized purposeful behavior, social relationships, and dynamic transformation. Affective experience was inseparable from this analysis. Nonetheless, their marginal status and holistic approach drew them toward extreme positions, most notably eugenics.

Journal

Journal of the History of IdeasUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jul 23, 2012

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