An Age of Infidels: The Politics of Religious Controversy in the Early United States by Eric R. Schlereth (review)

An Age of Infidels: The Politics of Religious Controversy in the Early United States by Eric R.... REVIEWS British, who many Americans believed were blocking their aspirations to extend the boundaries of the republic to the Pacific Ocean. Some Americans, Haynes contends, saw expansionism as an opportunity to break ``the vestigial bonds of their colonial heritage'' (229). Texans, however, sought annexation to the United States as a means to protect slavery, as well as to escape the perceived machinations of the British to block annexation. Allegations of British conspiracies in Texas, Oregon, and California animated much of American diplomacy in the 1840s; but as Haynes notes, it was based more on suspicion than fact. Of course, Polk's aggressive policies forced a settlement of the Oregon question and provoked the Mexican War that resulted in acquisition of territory and planted the American flag on the Pacific, ending fear of British encirclement. Americans now believed they had gained respect in Europe, and especially from Great Britain. But the achievement of Manifest Destiny, supposed a triumph for Anglophobia, ``failed miserably as an instrument of national unity'' (271). Anglophobia no longer elicited a great response from Americans. British free trade policies contributed to an economic boom in the U.S. and a softening of attitudes toward the British. Americans now http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

An Age of Infidels: The Politics of Religious Controversy in the Early United States by Eric R. Schlereth (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 34 (1) – Jan 28, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS British, who many Americans believed were blocking their aspirations to extend the boundaries of the republic to the Pacific Ocean. Some Americans, Haynes contends, saw expansionism as an opportunity to break ``the vestigial bonds of their colonial heritage'' (229). Texans, however, sought annexation to the United States as a means to protect slavery, as well as to escape the perceived machinations of the British to block annexation. Allegations of British conspiracies in Texas, Oregon, and California animated much of American diplomacy in the 1840s; but as Haynes notes, it was based more on suspicion than fact. Of course, Polk's aggressive policies forced a settlement of the Oregon question and provoked the Mexican War that resulted in acquisition of territory and planted the American flag on the Pacific, ending fear of British encirclement. Americans now believed they had gained respect in Europe, and especially from Great Britain. But the achievement of Manifest Destiny, supposed a triumph for Anglophobia, ``failed miserably as an instrument of national unity'' (271). Anglophobia no longer elicited a great response from Americans. British free trade policies contributed to an economic boom in the U.S. and a softening of attitudes toward the British. Americans now

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jan 28, 2014

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