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American Sovereigns: The People and America’s Constitutional Tradition Before the Civil War , and: The People and Their Peace: Legal Culture and Transformation of Inequality in the Post-Revolutionary South , and: The State as a Work of Art: The Cultural Origins of the Constitution (review)

American Sovereigns: The People and America’s Constitutional Tradition Before the Civil War ,... American Sovereigns: The People and America's Constitutional Tradition Before the Civil War. By Christian Fritz. (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Pp. 427. Cloth, $82.00; Paper, $29.99.) The People and Their Peace: Legal Culture and Transformation of Inequality in the Post-Revolutionary South. By Laura F. Edwards (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009. Pp. 448. Illustrations, maps. Cloth, $39.95.) The State as a Work of Art: The Cultural Origins of the Constitution. By Eric Slauter. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009. Pp. 428. Illustrations, charts. Cloth, $40.00.) Reviewed by William Pencak In the twenty-first century, what it means to interpret the United States Constitution has undergone a fundamental change from the scholarship that older members of the profession, such as myself, grew up with in the 1960s and 1970s. In that era, historians dedicated to social science history and ``history from the bottom up'' examined the economic status and regional allegiances of delegates to the Constitutional and state ratifying conventions. Forrest McDonald1 and Jackson Turner Main2 disputed whether the Constitution broadly represented the people or was primarily the work of a cosmopolitan elite that successfully imposed its nationalist vision on a locally minded populace. John P. Roche,3 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

American Sovereigns: The People and America’s Constitutional Tradition Before the Civil War , and: The People and Their Peace: Legal Culture and Transformation of Inequality in the Post-Revolutionary South , and: The State as a Work of Art: The Cultural Origins of the Constitution (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (1) – Feb 11, 2011

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

American Sovereigns: The People and America's Constitutional Tradition Before the Civil War. By Christian Fritz. (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Pp. 427. Cloth, $82.00; Paper, $29.99.) The People and Their Peace: Legal Culture and Transformation of Inequality in the Post-Revolutionary South. By Laura F. Edwards (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009. Pp. 448. Illustrations, maps. Cloth, $39.95.) The State as a Work of Art: The Cultural Origins of the Constitution. By Eric Slauter. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009. Pp. 428. Illustrations, charts. Cloth, $40.00.) Reviewed by William Pencak In the twenty-first century, what it means to interpret the United States Constitution has undergone a fundamental change from the scholarship that older members of the profession, such as myself, grew up with in the 1960s and 1970s. In that era, historians dedicated to social science history and ``history from the bottom up'' examined the economic status and regional allegiances of delegates to the Constitutional and state ratifying conventions. Forrest McDonald1 and Jackson Turner Main2 disputed whether the Constitution broadly represented the people or was primarily the work of a cosmopolitan elite that successfully imposed its nationalist vision on a locally minded populace. John P. Roche,3

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 11, 2011

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