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American Slavery, Irish Freedom: Abolition, Immigrant Citizenship, and the Transatlantic Movement for Irish Repeal (review)

American Slavery, Irish Freedom: Abolition, Immigrant Citizenship, and the Transatlantic Movement... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2011) Both authors reject the premise that these revitalization movements were somehow inauthentic resistance. Wheeler shows how Aupaumut constructed a vibrant, Christian republicanism with Native Americans at the center; he created a space for natives in the new nation. Silverman likewise highlights how Native peoples thought about, believed in, and built a vital Christianity. Two Brotherton preachers taught that Native survival depended on Christianity and civility, and that their past and present difficulties were the consequence of transgressions against God. Only by embracing Christianity could the community realize a Christian, Native utopia. Taking the faith of its subjects seriously is one of the most welcome parts of this collection. For too long, students of Christianity and Native Americans have seen religion as a secondary affair or in functional ways. Throughout this collection the editors demonstrated the various and intricate manifestations of faith. Perfect for an advanced undergraduate or graduate seminar on American Religion or Native Americans, this book is a welcome addition. Na than iel Wie wora is a PhD candidate in history at the University of Delaware. His current research examines antebellum evangelical perceptions of Mormonism. American Slavery, Irish Freedom: Abolition, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

American Slavery, Irish Freedom: Abolition, Immigrant Citizenship, and the Transatlantic Movement for Irish Repeal (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2011) Both authors reject the premise that these revitalization movements were somehow inauthentic resistance. Wheeler shows how Aupaumut constructed a vibrant, Christian republicanism with Native Americans at the center; he created a space for natives in the new nation. Silverman likewise highlights how Native peoples thought about, believed in, and built a vital Christianity. Two Brotherton preachers taught that Native survival depended on Christianity and civility, and that their past and present difficulties were the consequence of transgressions against God. Only by embracing Christianity could the community realize a Christian, Native utopia. Taking the faith of its subjects seriously is one of the most welcome parts of this collection. For too long, students of Christianity and Native Americans have seen religion as a secondary affair or in functional ways. Throughout this collection the editors demonstrated the various and intricate manifestations of faith. Perfect for an advanced undergraduate or graduate seminar on American Religion or Native Americans, this book is a welcome addition. Na than iel Wie wora is a PhD candidate in history at the University of Delaware. His current research examines antebellum evangelical perceptions of Mormonism. American Slavery, Irish Freedom: Abolition,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

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