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American Saint: Francis Asbury and the Methodists (review)

American Saint: Francis Asbury and the Methodists (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2010) into the twentieth century. A porous border policed predominantly with Texas troops proved ineffective at keeping disgruntled populations from coming to blows. War of a Thousand Deserts reintroduces a long forgotten actor in border politics and race relations. Raiding by Native Americans not only destabilized both Mexican and U.S. control of the area but also greatly altered relations between those two nations. In practicing successful Native American methods of warfare, groups likes the Texas Rangers paid begrudging tribute to their adversaries and provided an example of the cultural diffusion found along the borderlands. Finally, A Gallant Little Army offers evidence that race relations between Mexicans and Americans could be amicable and that personal histories perhaps altered interactions along the border more than did nationwide racial stereotypes. Taken together, these books provide excellent examples of the current state of the historiography of the antebellum west, and all are worthy additions to the libraries of students of the era or region. Jo seph F. S tol tz II I is a PhD student at Texas Christian University. His current research interest is early national U.S. military history. American Saint: Francis Asbury and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

American Saint: Francis Asbury and the Methodists (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (3) – Aug 19, 2010

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2010) into the twentieth century. A porous border policed predominantly with Texas troops proved ineffective at keeping disgruntled populations from coming to blows. War of a Thousand Deserts reintroduces a long forgotten actor in border politics and race relations. Raiding by Native Americans not only destabilized both Mexican and U.S. control of the area but also greatly altered relations between those two nations. In practicing successful Native American methods of warfare, groups likes the Texas Rangers paid begrudging tribute to their adversaries and provided an example of the cultural diffusion found along the borderlands. Finally, A Gallant Little Army offers evidence that race relations between Mexicans and Americans could be amicable and that personal histories perhaps altered interactions along the border more than did nationwide racial stereotypes. Taken together, these books provide excellent examples of the current state of the historiography of the antebellum west, and all are worthy additions to the libraries of students of the era or region. Jo seph F. S tol tz II I is a PhD student at Texas Christian University. His current research interest is early national U.S. military history. American Saint: Francis Asbury and the

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 19, 2010

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