Alogical Memory: Thinking Beyond (Counter)hegemonic Postdictatorial Discourse in Beatriz Bracher's Não falei

Alogical Memory: Thinking Beyond (Counter)hegemonic Postdictatorial Discourse in Beatriz... Abstract: In the novel Não falei , Beatriz Bracher engages with post-dictatorial memory in Brazil in ways that move beyond the denunciatory genres that have dominated literary production in the aftermath of dictatorship. Part of a younger generation of writers revisiting the cultural memory of dictatorships in the Southern Cone, Bracher offers new ways of reading the effects of dictatorship and resignifying these experiences in different social contexts. Building upon the critical work of such authors as Flora Süssekind, Idelber Avelar, and Nelly Richard, in dialogue with theoretical considerations on subalternity, hegemony, and discourse, in this essay I examine the ways in which Não falei explores the limits of the discursive logic of memory in postdictatorial Brazil. I argue that Bracher offers a more critical engagement with postdictatorial memory than much recent cultural production by creating an alogical narrative space that destabilizes the discursive mechanisms that dominate the cultural politics of memory today. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hispanic Review University of Pennsylvania Press

Alogical Memory: Thinking Beyond (Counter)hegemonic Postdictatorial Discourse in Beatriz Bracher's Não falei

Hispanic Review, Volume 82 (1) – Jan 13, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/alogical-memory-thinking-beyond-counter-hegemonic-postdictatorial-ZNuRjfbKB4
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press.
ISSN
1553-0639
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: In the novel Não falei , Beatriz Bracher engages with post-dictatorial memory in Brazil in ways that move beyond the denunciatory genres that have dominated literary production in the aftermath of dictatorship. Part of a younger generation of writers revisiting the cultural memory of dictatorships in the Southern Cone, Bracher offers new ways of reading the effects of dictatorship and resignifying these experiences in different social contexts. Building upon the critical work of such authors as Flora Süssekind, Idelber Avelar, and Nelly Richard, in dialogue with theoretical considerations on subalternity, hegemony, and discourse, in this essay I examine the ways in which Não falei explores the limits of the discursive logic of memory in postdictatorial Brazil. I argue that Bracher offers a more critical engagement with postdictatorial memory than much recent cultural production by creating an alogical narrative space that destabilizes the discursive mechanisms that dominate the cultural politics of memory today.

Journal

Hispanic ReviewUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jan 13, 2014

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off