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Aiming for Pensacola: Fugitive Slaves on the Atlantic and Southern Frontiers by Matthew J. Clavin (review)

Aiming for Pensacola: Fugitive Slaves on the Atlantic and Southern Frontiers by Matthew J. Clavin... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2017) the state removed 6,000 slaves to Africa annually, it would only take 80 years for slavery to disappear. In the same vein, there were also many non-slaveholders who supported slavery—they leased slaves, aspired to slave-owning in future time, or advocated strong property rights, even if that property was human chattel. Breen’s evidence for widespread criticism of slavery from non-slave-owning whites during and after the Turner rebellion is particularly thin, making his binary of elite slaveholders and poor non-slaveholders a less compelling claim. Despite a few theoretical misste, the major achievement of Breen’s book is his ability to show how the Nat Turner rebellion mobilized public opinion among both the white and black communities. Not only does Breen astutely show that whites and blacks were divided in their opinion of Nat Turner but he also demonstrates that ideas and actions forged during the revolt were ultimately aimed at preserving white and black communities alike. He shows convincingly that it was the actual experience of Nat Turner’s rebels visiting plantations, the deployment of the militia to find and quell the violence, and judges’ actions inside the courtroom that made all the difference. Ch http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Aiming for Pensacola: Fugitive Slaves on the Atlantic and Southern Frontiers by Matthew J. Clavin (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 37 (3) – Sep 1, 2017

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2017) the state removed 6,000 slaves to Africa annually, it would only take 80 years for slavery to disappear. In the same vein, there were also many non-slaveholders who supported slavery—they leased slaves, aspired to slave-owning in future time, or advocated strong property rights, even if that property was human chattel. Breen’s evidence for widespread criticism of slavery from non-slave-owning whites during and after the Turner rebellion is particularly thin, making his binary of elite slaveholders and poor non-slaveholders a less compelling claim. Despite a few theoretical misste, the major achievement of Breen’s book is his ability to show how the Nat Turner rebellion mobilized public opinion among both the white and black communities. Not only does Breen astutely show that whites and blacks were divided in their opinion of Nat Turner but he also demonstrates that ideas and actions forged during the revolt were ultimately aimed at preserving white and black communities alike. He shows convincingly that it was the actual experience of Nat Turner’s rebels visiting plantations, the deployment of the militia to find and quell the violence, and judges’ actions inside the courtroom that made all the difference. Ch

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Sep 1, 2017

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