Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

After the Siege: A Social History of Boston, 1775-1800 (review)

After the Siege: A Social History of Boston, 1775-1800 (review) REVIEWS proach to antislavery'' for women (8). Because historians have generally assumed that women's activism within third parties was minimal, this is a significant contribution to both antislavery and women's history. My own work on women abolitionists in the Old Northwest fully supports Blue's conclusions about the enthusiastic and important nature of women's participation. This valuable book achieves what most of us hope to in our scholarly monographs: it contributes to scholarly knowledge and debates, it brings to life interesting and inspiring people from our past, and it reads well. Students as well as scholars will benefit from a close perusal of this wonderful book. St acey Rob ert son is an associate professor in the History Department and Director of the Women's Studies Program at Bradley University. She is the author of Parker Pillsbury: Radical Abolitionist, Male Feminist (2000). Her current research is focused on women abolitionists in the Old Northwest. After the Siege: A Social History of Boston, 1775­1800. By Jacqueline Barbara Carr. (Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press, 2004. Pp. xv, 318. Illustrations, maps. Cloth, $40.00.) The town of Boston played a prominent role in the early stages of the American Revolution, providing the setting for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

After the Siege: A Social History of Boston, 1775-1800 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 25 (4)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/after-the-siege-a-social-history-of-boston-1775-1800-review-U0QZjUnWEw
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS proach to antislavery'' for women (8). Because historians have generally assumed that women's activism within third parties was minimal, this is a significant contribution to both antislavery and women's history. My own work on women abolitionists in the Old Northwest fully supports Blue's conclusions about the enthusiastic and important nature of women's participation. This valuable book achieves what most of us hope to in our scholarly monographs: it contributes to scholarly knowledge and debates, it brings to life interesting and inspiring people from our past, and it reads well. Students as well as scholars will benefit from a close perusal of this wonderful book. St acey Rob ert son is an associate professor in the History Department and Director of the Women's Studies Program at Bradley University. She is the author of Parker Pillsbury: Radical Abolitionist, Male Feminist (2000). Her current research is focused on women abolitionists in the Old Northwest. After the Siege: A Social History of Boston, 1775­1800. By Jacqueline Barbara Carr. (Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press, 2004. Pp. xv, 318. Illustrations, maps. Cloth, $40.00.) The town of Boston played a prominent role in the early stages of the American Revolution, providing the setting for

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

There are no references for this article.