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Abraham Ortelius's Pulmonary Cordiform Map

Abraham Ortelius's Pulmonary Cordiform Map <p>abstract:</p><p>Maps have often served as tools of political propaganda, particularly in the reign of Francis I (1515–1547). Cartography, as a highly flexible mode of representation, could encode any number of spiritual or political messages. Abraham Ortelius exploited this possibility by giving his world map of 1564 the distinct shape of a lung, which evoked both a 1541 map by Gemma Frisius and, indirectly, the philosophy of the heretical anatomist and cartographer Michael Servetus. This article describes the context in which Ortelius lived and worked: in Antwerp during the turbulent reign of Philip II of Spain, where he witnessed the Catholic king&apos;s repressive policies in the Low Countries. This article draws on the scholarship that connects the cartographer to the Family of Love in order to argue that Ortelius&apos;s spiritual beliefs were expressed through his world maps. Rather than attempting a definitive investigation of Ortelius&apos;s theology, this essay shows how Ortelius&apos;s work as a cartographer participated in the religious and political discourses of post-Reformation Europe.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies University of Pennsylvania Press

Abraham Ortelius&apos;s Pulmonary Cordiform Map

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © JEMCS, Inc.
ISSN
1553-3786

Abstract

<p>abstract:</p><p>Maps have often served as tools of political propaganda, particularly in the reign of Francis I (1515–1547). Cartography, as a highly flexible mode of representation, could encode any number of spiritual or political messages. Abraham Ortelius exploited this possibility by giving his world map of 1564 the distinct shape of a lung, which evoked both a 1541 map by Gemma Frisius and, indirectly, the philosophy of the heretical anatomist and cartographer Michael Servetus. This article describes the context in which Ortelius lived and worked: in Antwerp during the turbulent reign of Philip II of Spain, where he witnessed the Catholic king&apos;s repressive policies in the Low Countries. This article draws on the scholarship that connects the cartographer to the Family of Love in order to argue that Ortelius&apos;s spiritual beliefs were expressed through his world maps. Rather than attempting a definitive investigation of Ortelius&apos;s theology, this essay shows how Ortelius&apos;s work as a cartographer participated in the religious and political discourses of post-Reformation Europe.</p>

Journal

Journal for Early Modern Cultural StudiesUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jul 14, 2020

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