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A Town In-Between: Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and the Early Mid-Atlantic Interior (review)

A Town In-Between: Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and the Early Mid-Atlantic Interior (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2012) A Town In-Between: Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and the Early MidAtlantic Interior. By Judith Ridner. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010. Pp. 287. Cloth, $49.95.) Reviewed by Gabrielle M. Lanier The interior town of Carlisle, Pennsylvania was always, according to Judith Ridner, ``a town in-between.'' Geographically, it was an urban place in a rural area, situated between the urban east and the agrarian west. Culturally, it constituted a migration gateway to the interior, at times accommodating multiple and sometimes competing groups including Native Americans, English Quakers, Germans, and Scots­Irish. Economically, it formed the hub of the colonial fur trade. Militarily, it became a staging and supply ground during two major wars. This between-ness rendered Carlisle ``a contested space between east and west, north and south, Europe and America, and Euro-American and Native American'' (3­4). The region had always represented a geography of possibilities: for the first Native Americans who situated their villages there, for Thomas Penn and his officials who sought control of the area because it promised access to Philadelphia and the Native communities to the west, for the Scots­Irish colonists who risked hardship to gain personal and material success, for Congress http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

A Town In-Between: Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and the Early Mid-Atlantic Interior (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (4) – Oct 22, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2012) A Town In-Between: Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and the Early MidAtlantic Interior. By Judith Ridner. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010. Pp. 287. Cloth, $49.95.) Reviewed by Gabrielle M. Lanier The interior town of Carlisle, Pennsylvania was always, according to Judith Ridner, ``a town in-between.'' Geographically, it was an urban place in a rural area, situated between the urban east and the agrarian west. Culturally, it constituted a migration gateway to the interior, at times accommodating multiple and sometimes competing groups including Native Americans, English Quakers, Germans, and Scots­Irish. Economically, it formed the hub of the colonial fur trade. Militarily, it became a staging and supply ground during two major wars. This between-ness rendered Carlisle ``a contested space between east and west, north and south, Europe and America, and Euro-American and Native American'' (3­4). The region had always represented a geography of possibilities: for the first Native Americans who situated their villages there, for Thomas Penn and his officials who sought control of the area because it promised access to Philadelphia and the Native communities to the west, for the Scots­Irish colonists who risked hardship to gain personal and material success, for Congress

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

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