Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Passion for Nature: Thomas Jefferson and Natural History (review)

A Passion for Nature: Thomas Jefferson and Natural History (review) REVIEWS of emotion and sensibility, concerned with what Rozbicki describes as his own quarry: the ``subjective meanings people hold about themselves and their world'' (13). That disengagement compounds a problem of address that treats revolutionary-era historians, mythologizing populists, and an imagined American reader as a singular ``we'' to be admonished. ``We'' are, so we are told, ill at ease accepting that modern American liberty had its origins in exclusion and hierarchy (223); we are often misled, and so forth. Serious students of American history will surely find the finger-wagging decidedly unhelpful. Yet there is certainly rich insight to be gained from apprehending liberty as a social relation. The age of revolutions is often posited as the birth of modernity, with universal freedom as its benchmark. The claim continues to matter: Historians of Saint Domingue, such as Laurent Dubois, now seek to wrest that birthplace from its long-time French location. Historians of the age of revolution might do well to allow a little Bauman into their analyses, as they braid loyalists and rebels, reformers and radicals, elites and non-elites, into ongoing examinations of liberty, privilege, and revolution. Sa rah K not t is senior visiting research fellow at the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

A Passion for Nature: Thomas Jefferson and Natural History (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (2) – May 5, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/a-passion-for-nature-thomas-jefferson-and-natural-history-review-fqiPYFaW8i
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS of emotion and sensibility, concerned with what Rozbicki describes as his own quarry: the ``subjective meanings people hold about themselves and their world'' (13). That disengagement compounds a problem of address that treats revolutionary-era historians, mythologizing populists, and an imagined American reader as a singular ``we'' to be admonished. ``We'' are, so we are told, ill at ease accepting that modern American liberty had its origins in exclusion and hierarchy (223); we are often misled, and so forth. Serious students of American history will surely find the finger-wagging decidedly unhelpful. Yet there is certainly rich insight to be gained from apprehending liberty as a social relation. The age of revolutions is often posited as the birth of modernity, with universal freedom as its benchmark. The claim continues to matter: Historians of Saint Domingue, such as Laurent Dubois, now seek to wrest that birthplace from its long-time French location. Historians of the age of revolution might do well to allow a little Bauman into their analyses, as they braid loyalists and rebels, reformers and radicals, elites and non-elites, into ongoing examinations of liberty, privilege, and revolution. Sa rah K not t is senior visiting research fellow at the

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 5, 2012

There are no references for this article.