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A Paradise of Reason: William Bentley and Enlightenment Christianity in the Early Republic (review)

A Paradise of Reason: William Bentley and Enlightenment Christianity in the Early Republic (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2011) haps a museum worker stashed the pictures in the attic. But when? Maybe as early as 1863 when emancipation made them an outmoded remnant of slavery. Maybe in the 1890s when they could be read as scenes of white racial violence. Maybe in the late 1930s when Nazi atrocities carried the false science of race to its horrifying extreme. Maybe in the 1960s when the Civil Rights movement embarrassed the museum for its part in staging this act of inhuman condescension. Delia's Tears has brought the pictures down from the attic and set them back into circulation to trouble another generation. I wonder what questions they will raise next. An n Fab ian is a professor of history and American studies at Rutgers. Her most recent book is The Skull Collectors: Race, Science, and America's Unburied Dead (Chicago, 2010). A Paradise of Reason: William Bentley and Enlightenment Christianity in the Early Republic. By J. Rixey Ruffin. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. Pp. 266. Cloth, $65.00.) Reviewed by Nathan S. Rives William Bentley, who served as minister of the Congregational East Church in Salem, Massachusetts, from 1783 until his death in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

A Paradise of Reason: William Bentley and Enlightenment Christianity in the Early Republic (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (3) – Aug 11, 2011

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2011) haps a museum worker stashed the pictures in the attic. But when? Maybe as early as 1863 when emancipation made them an outmoded remnant of slavery. Maybe in the 1890s when they could be read as scenes of white racial violence. Maybe in the late 1930s when Nazi atrocities carried the false science of race to its horrifying extreme. Maybe in the 1960s when the Civil Rights movement embarrassed the museum for its part in staging this act of inhuman condescension. Delia's Tears has brought the pictures down from the attic and set them back into circulation to trouble another generation. I wonder what questions they will raise next. An n Fab ian is a professor of history and American studies at Rutgers. Her most recent book is The Skull Collectors: Race, Science, and America's Unburied Dead (Chicago, 2010). A Paradise of Reason: William Bentley and Enlightenment Christianity in the Early Republic. By J. Rixey Ruffin. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. Pp. 266. Cloth, $65.00.) Reviewed by Nathan S. Rives William Bentley, who served as minister of the Congregational East Church in Salem, Massachusetts, from 1783 until his death in

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 11, 2011

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