Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A New England Prison Diary: Slander, Religion, and Markets in Early America by Martin J. Hershock (review)

A New England Prison Diary: Slander, Religion, and Markets in Early America by Martin J. Hershock... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2013) and ``personal quirks'' (4). While he cites Joanne B. Freeman's Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic (New Haven, CT, 2001) at a couple of points, he never really applies her understanding of early republican ideas about honor, character, and gentility even to the courtroom itself, much less to the trial-plagued city beyond its doors. He dismisses a weeklong, multi-letter affair of honor between Burr's attorney John Wickham and General James Wilkinson in two sentences, misrepresenting its outcome in the process (187). And he misses entirely that a letter from prosecuting attorney George Hay to Wickham marked a formal initiation of an affair of honor (169­70, 184­85). At times, this book reads as if it grew out of a biography of Marshall. Once he has the trial underway, Newmyer rarely follows the action beyond Marshall's ken, entirely omitting the extensive testimony that was given in the grand jury room and recorded by one of its members. He is overly critical toward Jefferson and overly generous toward Marshall, characterizing as a ``rumor'' a report of the judge discussing the trial with Wickham over a game of chess that clearly came http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

A New England Prison Diary: Slander, Religion, and Markets in Early America by Martin J. Hershock (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 33 (4) – Nov 18, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/a-new-england-prison-diary-slander-religion-and-markets-in-early-1t5AFers3t
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2013) and ``personal quirks'' (4). While he cites Joanne B. Freeman's Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic (New Haven, CT, 2001) at a couple of points, he never really applies her understanding of early republican ideas about honor, character, and gentility even to the courtroom itself, much less to the trial-plagued city beyond its doors. He dismisses a weeklong, multi-letter affair of honor between Burr's attorney John Wickham and General James Wilkinson in two sentences, misrepresenting its outcome in the process (187). And he misses entirely that a letter from prosecuting attorney George Hay to Wickham marked a formal initiation of an affair of honor (169­70, 184­85). At times, this book reads as if it grew out of a biography of Marshall. Once he has the trial underway, Newmyer rarely follows the action beyond Marshall's ken, entirely omitting the extensive testimony that was given in the grand jury room and recorded by one of its members. He is overly critical toward Jefferson and overly generous toward Marshall, characterizing as a ``rumor'' a report of the judge discussing the trial with Wickham over a game of chess that clearly came

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 18, 2013

There are no references for this article.