Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Hercules in the Cradle: War, Money, and the American State, 1783-1867 by Max M. Edling (review)

A Hercules in the Cradle: War, Money, and the American State, 1783-1867 by Max M. Edling (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2016) Castronovo, however, whose deepest impulses seem to be Marxist and post-Marxist, has internalized the post-Structuralist skepticism about ``reality'' so as to give us a prehistory of partisan journalism. Castronovo's attempt to rehabilitate propaganda seems a symptom of our epoch, with its zero-sum politics, suspicion of the motives of every political actor, and the transformation of fact-based journalism into highly motivated propaganda. Fox News's derided tag line, ``fair and balanced,'' is widely understood as a kind of Orwellian doublespeak, by which unfair and unbalanced news presents itself in an alternative reality. Truth, by this account, is so open to dispute and ambiguities and bias that it can no longer be the basis of politics. We are left with the pure struggle for influence mediated by an information war where the winner is not the best idea, or the most persuasive argument, but the agent who propagates its bias best, by getting their message spread to the most minds, people, places. Castronovo leaves us with this feeble consolation: that ``people actively participate in propaganda'' (21). Wi llia m Wa rne r is professor of English and comparative literature at the University of California http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

A Hercules in the Cradle: War, Money, and the American State, 1783-1867 by Max M. Edling (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 36 (1) – Feb 25, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/a-hercules-in-the-cradle-war-money-and-the-american-state-1783-1867-by-NJCDOBpLT4
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2016) Castronovo, however, whose deepest impulses seem to be Marxist and post-Marxist, has internalized the post-Structuralist skepticism about ``reality'' so as to give us a prehistory of partisan journalism. Castronovo's attempt to rehabilitate propaganda seems a symptom of our epoch, with its zero-sum politics, suspicion of the motives of every political actor, and the transformation of fact-based journalism into highly motivated propaganda. Fox News's derided tag line, ``fair and balanced,'' is widely understood as a kind of Orwellian doublespeak, by which unfair and unbalanced news presents itself in an alternative reality. Truth, by this account, is so open to dispute and ambiguities and bias that it can no longer be the basis of politics. We are left with the pure struggle for influence mediated by an information war where the winner is not the best idea, or the most persuasive argument, but the agent who propagates its bias best, by getting their message spread to the most minds, people, places. Castronovo leaves us with this feeble consolation: that ``people actively participate in propaganda'' (21). Wi llia m Wa rne r is professor of English and comparative literature at the University of California

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 25, 2016

There are no references for this article.