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A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City (review)

A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2011) A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City. By Erica Armstrong Dunbar. (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. 2008. Pp. 212. Cloth, $55.00) Reviewed by Rita Reynolds The history of African American women has evolved over the past 25 years at a relatively slow pace when compared with African American history in general. Deborah Gray White's Ar'n't I A Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South, published in 1985 (New York), was one of the first books to consider African American slave women as scholarly subjects in their own right. Jean Yellin Fagan's efforts to prove Harriet Jacobs's slave narrative Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl was fact and not abolitionist fiction validated Jacobs's work as historical document. Jacqueline Jones's Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow: Black Women, Work, and the Family from Slavery to the Present (New York, 2009) did much to unravel the dynamics of race, class, and gender for laboring black women in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In like manner Catherine Clinton reevaluated the complexities of life for domestic southern slave women and for the wealthy white women whose seemingly neverending http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (2) – Apr 21, 2011

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2011) A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City. By Erica Armstrong Dunbar. (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. 2008. Pp. 212. Cloth, $55.00) Reviewed by Rita Reynolds The history of African American women has evolved over the past 25 years at a relatively slow pace when compared with African American history in general. Deborah Gray White's Ar'n't I A Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South, published in 1985 (New York), was one of the first books to consider African American slave women as scholarly subjects in their own right. Jean Yellin Fagan's efforts to prove Harriet Jacobs's slave narrative Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl was fact and not abolitionist fiction validated Jacobs's work as historical document. Jacqueline Jones's Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow: Black Women, Work, and the Family from Slavery to the Present (New York, 2009) did much to unravel the dynamics of race, class, and gender for laboring black women in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In like manner Catherine Clinton reevaluated the complexities of life for domestic southern slave women and for the wealthy white women whose seemingly neverending

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 21, 2011

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