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A Cultural History of Witchcraft

A Cultural History of Witchcraft ´ G A B O R K L A N I C Z AY Central European University for Peter Burke It was Peter Burke who got me into the ``witchcraft business'' more than a quarter of a century ago, and this overview of research on witchcraft, the first version of which was prepared for a conference celebrating his seventieth birthday in 2007, is dedicated to him. Let me begin this historiographic overview with a few personal remarks recalling our cooperation. I first met Peter Burke in 1982 at an Economic History congress in Budapest. I was a research assistant at the time, developing an interest in various aspects of ``popular religion,'' such as heresy, sainthood, and shamanism,1 and I was eager to hear his theoretically based insights into the history of ``popular culture.''2 He invited me to a large-scale comparative conference on the history of European witchcraft in Stockholm, which he was organizing with Bengt Ankarloo and Gustav Henningsen in coordination with the Olin Foundation in 1984. He encouraged me to broaden my interest from Hungarian shamanism to an overall examination of Hungarian witch trials (a historical topic that at the time had not been made the subject http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft University of Pennsylvania Press

A Cultural History of Witchcraft

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft , Volume 5 (2) – Dec 2, 2010

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1940-5111
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Abstract

´ G A B O R K L A N I C Z AY Central European University for Peter Burke It was Peter Burke who got me into the ``witchcraft business'' more than a quarter of a century ago, and this overview of research on witchcraft, the first version of which was prepared for a conference celebrating his seventieth birthday in 2007, is dedicated to him. Let me begin this historiographic overview with a few personal remarks recalling our cooperation. I first met Peter Burke in 1982 at an Economic History congress in Budapest. I was a research assistant at the time, developing an interest in various aspects of ``popular religion,'' such as heresy, sainthood, and shamanism,1 and I was eager to hear his theoretically based insights into the history of ``popular culture.''2 He invited me to a large-scale comparative conference on the history of European witchcraft in Stockholm, which he was organizing with Bengt Ankarloo and Gustav Henningsen in coordination with the Olin Foundation in 1984. He encouraged me to broaden my interest from Hungarian shamanism to an overall examination of Hungarian witch trials (a historical topic that at the time had not been made the subject

Journal

Magic, Ritual, and WitchcraftUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Dec 2, 2010

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