A Companion to the Era of Andrew Jackson by Sean Patrick Adams (review)

A Companion to the Era of Andrew Jackson by Sean Patrick Adams (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2013) number of characteristics of the poor, ranging from their literacy rates, to the communities that assisted one another, to the types and amount of food they consumed. I have several minor quibbles with the book, one of which actually works in favor of the author, while the others do not undermine the volume's major arguments. First, Murray most likely underestimates the number of white lower-class Charlestonians. As other historians of early American urban centers have found, official records notoriously undercounted laboring people. If the group is larger than Murray believes, that simply adds more weight to his study. Second, the book boldly declares that ``ideology took a backseat'' (7) to belly factors in the lives of poorer people, a point of debate among scholars. His contention is not supported with much evidence. Indeed, the records Murray analyzes, as rich as they are, do not shed too much light on the political ideology of poorer people. In their dealings with officials (as Murray recognizes), they usually had to play the role of deferential supplicant to obtain their goals; expressing radical ideas would hardly achieve those ends. Finally, Murray may be too facile http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

A Companion to the Era of Andrew Jackson by Sean Patrick Adams (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 33 (4) – Nov 18, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/a-companion-to-the-era-of-andrew-jackson-by-sean-patrick-adams-review-BFzMaqVJzW
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2013) number of characteristics of the poor, ranging from their literacy rates, to the communities that assisted one another, to the types and amount of food they consumed. I have several minor quibbles with the book, one of which actually works in favor of the author, while the others do not undermine the volume's major arguments. First, Murray most likely underestimates the number of white lower-class Charlestonians. As other historians of early American urban centers have found, official records notoriously undercounted laboring people. If the group is larger than Murray believes, that simply adds more weight to his study. Second, the book boldly declares that ``ideology took a backseat'' (7) to belly factors in the lives of poorer people, a point of debate among scholars. His contention is not supported with much evidence. Indeed, the records Murray analyzes, as rich as they are, do not shed too much light on the political ideology of poorer people. In their dealings with officials (as Murray recognizes), they usually had to play the role of deferential supplicant to obtain their goals; expressing radical ideas would hardly achieve those ends. Finally, Murray may be too facile

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 18, 2013

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off