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1917: The Ambivalence of Empire

1917: The Ambivalence of Empire T HE J EWISH Q UA R T E R LY R EVIE W, Vol. 108, No. 4 (Fall 2018) 526–530 LIORA R . HALPERIN University of Washington W HEN THE B AL FOU R D E C LA R ATI O N was first published on Novem- ber 2, 1917, as Britain was jockeying for its position in the Levant, the significance of this nonbinding and highly vague document was unclear. It was somewhat clarified—though by no means fully so—in 1922 after Britain took control of Palestine and the Declaration was integrated into the language of the League of Nations Mandate for Palestine, which also included a statement of Britain’s obligation to facilitate Jewish immigra- tion. Observers in the Yishuv attached near-messianic significance to the stated British imperial commitment to the Jewish national project, despite mixed messages from the British about the extent to which the mandatory government would indeed promote immigration, given the likelihood that a Jewish influx would inflame local conflict. Many imag- ined that, in the aftermath of the Mandate, thousands of Jews would stream into Palestine and constitute the third massive aliyah of Jews, following in the path of those ancient Jews who returned http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Jewish Quarterly Review University of Pennsylvania Press

1917: The Ambivalence of Empire

Jewish Quarterly Review , Volume 108 (4) – Nov 13, 2018

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for Advanced Judaic Studies, University of Pennsylvania.
ISSN
1553-0604

Abstract

T HE J EWISH Q UA R T E R LY R EVIE W, Vol. 108, No. 4 (Fall 2018) 526–530 LIORA R . HALPERIN University of Washington W HEN THE B AL FOU R D E C LA R ATI O N was first published on Novem- ber 2, 1917, as Britain was jockeying for its position in the Levant, the significance of this nonbinding and highly vague document was unclear. It was somewhat clarified—though by no means fully so—in 1922 after Britain took control of Palestine and the Declaration was integrated into the language of the League of Nations Mandate for Palestine, which also included a statement of Britain’s obligation to facilitate Jewish immigra- tion. Observers in the Yishuv attached near-messianic significance to the stated British imperial commitment to the Jewish national project, despite mixed messages from the British about the extent to which the mandatory government would indeed promote immigration, given the likelihood that a Jewish influx would inflame local conflict. Many imag- ined that, in the aftermath of the Mandate, thousands of Jews would stream into Palestine and constitute the third massive aliyah of Jews, following in the path of those ancient Jews who returned

Journal

Jewish Quarterly ReviewUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 13, 2018

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