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Zelda Sayre, Belle

Zelda Sayre, Belle ESSAY ...................... by Linda Wagner-Martin Readers of F. Scott Fitzgerald's Jazz Age literature tend to assume that his wife, Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, must have emerged from that same world. In fact, she was a quintessential southern belle from Montgomery, Alabama. Photograph of F. Scott and Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, from the collections of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald at Princeton University Library, used by permission of Harold Ober Associates as agents for the Fitzgerald Trustees; reproduced courtesy of Princeton University Library. here are few more memorable wives in twentieth-century American culture than Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, who was married to the successful young author F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1920. His first novel, This Side of Paradise, had appeared a few weeks before their marriage. Because of his popularization of the Jazz Age, complete with its New York partying, elite college society, and alcohol, dancing, and flappers, readers tend to place his beautiful bride with the exotic name--Zelda-- within those fictional contexts. In reality, Zelda Sayre had never been to New York City until she went there, accompanied by her older married sister, to wed Fitzgerald. Neither had she been abroad, nor had she gone to college. In fact, she had http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Zelda Sayre, Belle

Southern Cultures , Volume 10 (2) – Aug 6, 2004

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

ESSAY ...................... by Linda Wagner-Martin Readers of F. Scott Fitzgerald's Jazz Age literature tend to assume that his wife, Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, must have emerged from that same world. In fact, she was a quintessential southern belle from Montgomery, Alabama. Photograph of F. Scott and Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, from the collections of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald at Princeton University Library, used by permission of Harold Ober Associates as agents for the Fitzgerald Trustees; reproduced courtesy of Princeton University Library. here are few more memorable wives in twentieth-century American culture than Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, who was married to the successful young author F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1920. His first novel, This Side of Paradise, had appeared a few weeks before their marriage. Because of his popularization of the Jazz Age, complete with its New York partying, elite college society, and alcohol, dancing, and flappers, readers tend to place his beautiful bride with the exotic name--Zelda-- within those fictional contexts. In reality, Zelda Sayre had never been to New York City until she went there, accompanied by her older married sister, to wed Fitzgerald. Neither had she been abroad, nor had she gone to college. In fact, she had

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 6, 2004

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