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William Smith’s Catonian Loyalism, Race, and the Politics of Language

William Smith’s Catonian Loyalism, Race, and the Politics of Language christopher a. hunter   California Institute of Technology William Smith’s Catonian Loyalism, Race, and the Politics of Language In early 1776, all Philadelphia knew where Rev. William Smith’s loyalties lay. That February, at the behest of the Continental Congress, the Anglican clergyman and provost of the College of Philadelphia presided over an elaborate memorial service for Richard Montgomery, the American general killed in the failed invasion of Quebec. The city’s notables packed the new German Reformed Church to hear Smith venerate the man he called the “Proto-­Martyr to your rights” (Oration 23).1 After comparing Montgomery’s and Cincinnatus’s devotion to “virtue, liberty, truth, and justice,” Smith no doubt surprised many in the audience by prais) ing Montgomery’s “loyalty to his sovereign” (24, 31–­ . Quoting the Olive Branch Petition, a six-­ onth-­ ld last-­ itch effort to avert the Revolution, Smith boldly declared, “the delegated voice of the continent . . . supports me in praying for a restoration ‘of the former harmony between Great Britain and these Colonies’” (33). But the king had refused even to read Congress’s olive branch, and the delegated voice of the continent no longer saw reconciliation as a viable possibility. Privately, John Adams http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

William Smith’s Catonian Loyalism, Race, and the Politics of Language

Early American Literature , Volume 52 (3) – Oct 31, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-147X
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Abstract

christopher a. hunter   California Institute of Technology William Smith’s Catonian Loyalism, Race, and the Politics of Language In early 1776, all Philadelphia knew where Rev. William Smith’s loyalties lay. That February, at the behest of the Continental Congress, the Anglican clergyman and provost of the College of Philadelphia presided over an elaborate memorial service for Richard Montgomery, the American general killed in the failed invasion of Quebec. The city’s notables packed the new German Reformed Church to hear Smith venerate the man he called the “Proto-­Martyr to your rights” (Oration 23).1 After comparing Montgomery’s and Cincinnatus’s devotion to “virtue, liberty, truth, and justice,” Smith no doubt surprised many in the audience by prais) ing Montgomery’s “loyalty to his sovereign” (24, 31–­ . Quoting the Olive Branch Petition, a six-­ onth-­ ld last-­ itch effort to avert the Revolution, Smith boldly declared, “the delegated voice of the continent . . . supports me in praying for a restoration ‘of the former harmony between Great Britain and these Colonies’” (33). But the king had refused even to read Congress’s olive branch, and the delegated voice of the continent no longer saw reconciliation as a viable possibility. Privately, John Adams

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2017

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