Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

William Friday: Power, Purpose, and American Higher Education (review)

William Friday: Power, Purpose, and American Higher Education (review) 402Southern Cultures William Friday: Power, Purpose, and American Higher Education. By William A. Link. University of North Carolina Press, 1995. 494 pp. Cloth, $29.95. Reviewed by Clarence L. Mohr, Tulane University Throughout much of the present century, the University of North Carolina has been a crown jewel of southern higher learning. Embodying the substance of things hoped for in neighboring states, the North Carolina system eclipsed all regional competitors in the decades surrounding World War II and acquired a powerful and lasting mystique. The university's standing owed much to such legendary figures as Howard W. Odum, the modernizing academic entrepreneur whose Institute for Research in Social Science financed and gave legitimacy to regional scholarship in a number of disciplines, and historian Frank Porter Graham, the crusading liberal who, in 1931, began an eighteen-year tenure as presi- dent of the newly consolidated University of North Carolina, a three-campus entity that included, in addition to Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University in Raleigh and Woman's College of North Carolina in Greensboro. The closing years of Graham's presidency overlapped briefly with the early aca- demic career of William Clyde Friday, another figure destined to shape the course of higher education in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

William Friday: Power, Purpose, and American Higher Education (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (3) – Jan 4, 1996

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/william-friday-power-purpose-and-american-higher-education-review-jwuGOlgDzQ

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

402Southern Cultures William Friday: Power, Purpose, and American Higher Education. By William A. Link. University of North Carolina Press, 1995. 494 pp. Cloth, $29.95. Reviewed by Clarence L. Mohr, Tulane University Throughout much of the present century, the University of North Carolina has been a crown jewel of southern higher learning. Embodying the substance of things hoped for in neighboring states, the North Carolina system eclipsed all regional competitors in the decades surrounding World War II and acquired a powerful and lasting mystique. The university's standing owed much to such legendary figures as Howard W. Odum, the modernizing academic entrepreneur whose Institute for Research in Social Science financed and gave legitimacy to regional scholarship in a number of disciplines, and historian Frank Porter Graham, the crusading liberal who, in 1931, began an eighteen-year tenure as presi- dent of the newly consolidated University of North Carolina, a three-campus entity that included, in addition to Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University in Raleigh and Woman's College of North Carolina in Greensboro. The closing years of Graham's presidency overlapped briefly with the early aca- demic career of William Clyde Friday, another figure destined to shape the course of higher education in

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1996

There are no references for this article.