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William Faulkner and the Ledgers of History

William Faulkner and the Ledgers of History William Faulkner and the Ledgers of History by Sally Wolff Recently I interviewed Dr. Edgar Wiggin Francisco III, whose father, Edgar Francisco, Jr., was a friend of William Faulkner. As a boy, Edgar III was present and listening when Faulkner made frequent trips to Holly Springs, Mississippi, to visit the McCarroll/Francisco family at the home that has been in their family for one hundred seventy-six years. Now, at the age of seventy-nine, Dr. Francisco reminisced with me about those days. During the first interview, his wife Anne suggested that he show me the family diary that belonged to his great-great-grandfather.1 He disappeared from the room and returned momentarily with a volume written originally in longhand in the 1800s by his ancestor, who owned plantation lands in Mississippi and Arkansas. He explained that this volume was one of seven typescript volumes, all of which were prepared from the original, and handed it to me. Among the typescript pages were some facsimiles of the original, handwritten diary that had been composed on ledger paper. The handwriting is in the old, nineteenth-century style and difficult to decipher. Seeing the ledger instantly brought to my mind the ledger sections of Go Down, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

William Faulkner and the Ledgers of History

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 42 (1) – Jan 27, 2009

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
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Abstract

William Faulkner and the Ledgers of History by Sally Wolff Recently I interviewed Dr. Edgar Wiggin Francisco III, whose father, Edgar Francisco, Jr., was a friend of William Faulkner. As a boy, Edgar III was present and listening when Faulkner made frequent trips to Holly Springs, Mississippi, to visit the McCarroll/Francisco family at the home that has been in their family for one hundred seventy-six years. Now, at the age of seventy-nine, Dr. Francisco reminisced with me about those days. During the first interview, his wife Anne suggested that he show me the family diary that belonged to his great-great-grandfather.1 He disappeared from the room and returned momentarily with a volume written originally in longhand in the 1800s by his ancestor, who owned plantation lands in Mississippi and Arkansas. He explained that this volume was one of seven typescript volumes, all of which were prepared from the original, and handed it to me. Among the typescript pages were some facsimiles of the original, handwritten diary that had been composed on ledger paper. The handwriting is in the old, nineteenth-century style and difficult to decipher. Seeing the ledger instantly brought to my mind the ledger sections of Go Down,

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 27, 2009

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