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"White on White and Black": The Terror of Whiteness in Sarah Kane's Crave

"White on White and Black": The Terror of Whiteness in Sarah Kane's Crave Meg Peters “White on White and Black” The Terror of Whiteness in Sarah Kane’s Crave Critics have been hesitant to talk about race in the context of British playwright Sarah Kane’s Crav (1 e998), arguing that although early performances cast C as a black woman, the play itself does not include any indications of race. Jolene Arm- strong, for instance, describes a Canadian production of as inc Crave luding four actors “none [of whom were] visibly identifiable as belonging to a racial minority” (143), presumably meaning that all four actors were white. While I agree that the play is ambiguous with regards to race, to claim that the play does not interact with race at all, especially by describing the actors as not “belonging to a racial minority,” upholds whiteness as unmarked, normal, and justified in its a per lvasi l- ve power. To discuss race only when people of colour are directly involved or referenced assumes that white people are not implicated in systems of race, disavowing the privilege they oen r ft eceive through these very systems. Given that is a Crav me biguous about all character descriptions, not just race, it seems as though ignoring race http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

"White on White and Black": The Terror of Whiteness in Sarah Kane's Crave

The Comparatist , Volume 42 – Nov 19, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Meg Peters “White on White and Black” The Terror of Whiteness in Sarah Kane’s Crave Critics have been hesitant to talk about race in the context of British playwright Sarah Kane’s Crav (1 e998), arguing that although early performances cast C as a black woman, the play itself does not include any indications of race. Jolene Arm- strong, for instance, describes a Canadian production of as inc Crave luding four actors “none [of whom were] visibly identifiable as belonging to a racial minority” (143), presumably meaning that all four actors were white. While I agree that the play is ambiguous with regards to race, to claim that the play does not interact with race at all, especially by describing the actors as not “belonging to a racial minority,” upholds whiteness as unmarked, normal, and justified in its a per lvasi l- ve power. To discuss race only when people of colour are directly involved or referenced assumes that white people are not implicated in systems of race, disavowing the privilege they oen r ft eceive through these very systems. Given that is a Crav me biguous about all character descriptions, not just race, it seems as though ignoring race

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 19, 2018

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