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When Remedial Means What It Says: How Teachers Use Data to Reform Instructional Interventions

When Remedial Means What It Says: How Teachers Use Data to Reform Instructional Interventions As technology becomes increasingly integrated into K-12 education, the use of data is growing in volume and complexity, resulting in a paradox of information overload for educators. While administrators and teachers have access to more data than ever before, they are only just beginning to understand the impact of data on program improvement. In a case study of one high-performing California high school, teacher leaders analyzed multiple sources of data related to the school's program placement practices, specifically those related to a reading intervention program. Results indicate that low performing students can benefit from specific instruction tailored to their needs in courses that are not classified as "college preparatory." This study poses implications for administrators and instructional leaders who use data to inform their placement practices, ability grouping, and instructional interventions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

When Remedial Means What It Says: How Teachers Use Data to Reform Instructional Interventions

The High School Journal , Volume 92 (2) – Dec 18, 2008

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

As technology becomes increasingly integrated into K-12 education, the use of data is growing in volume and complexity, resulting in a paradox of information overload for educators. While administrators and teachers have access to more data than ever before, they are only just beginning to understand the impact of data on program improvement. In a case study of one high-performing California high school, teacher leaders analyzed multiple sources of data related to the school's program placement practices, specifically those related to a reading intervention program. Results indicate that low performing students can benefit from specific instruction tailored to their needs in courses that are not classified as "college preparatory." This study poses implications for administrators and instructional leaders who use data to inform their placement practices, ability grouping, and instructional interventions.

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 18, 2008

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