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What is Progress?: Desegregating an Indian School in Robeson County, North Carolina

What is Progress?: Desegregating an Indian School in Robeson County, North Carolina Southern Voices What is Progress? Desegregating an Indian School in Robeson County, North Carolina B Y JA M E S A RT H U R J O N E S A S T O L D T O M A L I N DA M AY N O R Robeson County, North Carolina's public schools, like many other school districts in the South, did not begin integrating until the 1970s. But unlike many places in the South, Robeson County had to integrate three--not just two--sets of schools. One for whites, one for blacks, and one for Native Americans, members of the Lumbee and Tuscarora tribes. These tribes had fought hard to have their own schools, and when the pressure to integrate the schools became intense, few Native Americans wanted it. They remembered their ancestors' struggle to establish their own school in the 1880s, when the state had tried to force them to attend school with African Americans or not attend school at all. Such a fight resulted in the establishment of the Indian-only school system, a symbol of tribal autonomy, and the founding of what would become the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. For the Lumbee and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

What is Progress?: Desegregating an Indian School in Robeson County, North Carolina

Southern Cultures , Volume 10 (2) – Aug 6, 2004

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Southern Voices What is Progress? Desegregating an Indian School in Robeson County, North Carolina B Y JA M E S A RT H U R J O N E S A S T O L D T O M A L I N DA M AY N O R Robeson County, North Carolina's public schools, like many other school districts in the South, did not begin integrating until the 1970s. But unlike many places in the South, Robeson County had to integrate three--not just two--sets of schools. One for whites, one for blacks, and one for Native Americans, members of the Lumbee and Tuscarora tribes. These tribes had fought hard to have their own schools, and when the pressure to integrate the schools became intense, few Native Americans wanted it. They remembered their ancestors' struggle to establish their own school in the 1880s, when the state had tried to force them to attend school with African Americans or not attend school at all. Such a fight resulted in the establishment of the Indian-only school system, a symbol of tribal autonomy, and the founding of what would become the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. For the Lumbee and

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 6, 2004

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