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“What Better Tool Do I Have?”: A Critical Race Approach to Teaching Civics

“What Better Tool Do I Have?”: A Critical Race Approach to Teaching Civics <p>Abstract:</p><p>Black teachers have understood for centuries that whiteness is a requirement for full citizenship in the United States (Ladson-Billings, 1998). For this reason, Black teachers have historically taught Black students using emancipatory methods that centered their students’ race and aided their students in navigating a landscape wrought with overt individual, institutional, and structural racism (Scheurich &amp; Young, 1997). This is also true of contemporary Black teachers, who understand that white supremacy is just as present as it ever has been. Using data from a larger study, this paper focuses on a Black civics teacher who used a critical race approach to structure the American Government course she taught primarily to Black students. Findings indicate that she rejected the notion of colorblindness in the law, worked to prepare her students for the racism they would experience, and incorporated students’ counterstories into her classes.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

“What Better Tool Do I Have?”: A Critical Race Approach to Teaching Civics

The High School Journal , Volume 103 (3) – Dec 18, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Black teachers have understood for centuries that whiteness is a requirement for full citizenship in the United States (Ladson-Billings, 1998). For this reason, Black teachers have historically taught Black students using emancipatory methods that centered their students’ race and aided their students in navigating a landscape wrought with overt individual, institutional, and structural racism (Scheurich &amp; Young, 1997). This is also true of contemporary Black teachers, who understand that white supremacy is just as present as it ever has been. Using data from a larger study, this paper focuses on a Black civics teacher who used a critical race approach to structure the American Government course she taught primarily to Black students. Findings indicate that she rejected the notion of colorblindness in the law, worked to prepare her students for the racism they would experience, and incorporated students’ counterstories into her classes.</p>

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 18, 2020

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