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Wendell Phillips, Social Justice, and the Power of the Past ed. by A J Aiséirithe and Donald Yacovone (review)

Wendell Phillips, Social Justice, and the Power of the Past ed. by A J Aiséirithe and Donald... perceived status differences, ethnic identification, or religious belief—often counteracted communal solidarity. Douglas Egerton suggests in Gabriel’s Rebellion: The Virginia Slave Conspiracies of 1800 and 1802 (1993), for instance, that rural-urban and religious differences stunted and ultimately helped doom Prosser’s revolutionary plans. Perhaps such cleavages shaped processes of homosocial bonding. And although Lussana, White, and Camp have identified distinct homosocial worlds among slaves, historians are only beginning to explore the full range and significance of heterosocial ties and behaviors among the enslaved. It will be the work of subsequent historians to address these issues. But Lussana’s male solidarity thesis will certainly be an important part of the conversation. Bret E. Carroll notes 1. Bertram Wyatt-Brown, “The Mask of Obedience: Male Slave Psychology in the Slave South,” American Historical Review 93, no. 5 (1988): 1228–52; Edward E. Baptist, “The Absent Subject: African American Masculinity and Forced Migration to the Antebellum Plantation Frontier,” in Southern Manhood: Perspectives on Masculinity in the Old South, ed. Craig Thompson Friend and Lorri Glover (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2004), 136–73; and Kenneth E. Marshall, Manhood Enslaved: Bondmen in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century New Jersey (Rochester, N.Y.: University of Rochester Press, 1911). 2. Deborah Gray White, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Wendell Phillips, Social Justice, and the Power of the Past ed. by A J Aiséirithe and Donald Yacovone (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 7 (4) – Oct 31, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

perceived status differences, ethnic identification, or religious belief—often counteracted communal solidarity. Douglas Egerton suggests in Gabriel’s Rebellion: The Virginia Slave Conspiracies of 1800 and 1802 (1993), for instance, that rural-urban and religious differences stunted and ultimately helped doom Prosser’s revolutionary plans. Perhaps such cleavages shaped processes of homosocial bonding. And although Lussana, White, and Camp have identified distinct homosocial worlds among slaves, historians are only beginning to explore the full range and significance of heterosocial ties and behaviors among the enslaved. It will be the work of subsequent historians to address these issues. But Lussana’s male solidarity thesis will certainly be an important part of the conversation. Bret E. Carroll notes 1. Bertram Wyatt-Brown, “The Mask of Obedience: Male Slave Psychology in the Slave South,” American Historical Review 93, no. 5 (1988): 1228–52; Edward E. Baptist, “The Absent Subject: African American Masculinity and Forced Migration to the Antebellum Plantation Frontier,” in Southern Manhood: Perspectives on Masculinity in the Old South, ed. Craig Thompson Friend and Lorri Glover (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2004), 136–73; and Kenneth E. Marshall, Manhood Enslaved: Bondmen in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century New Jersey (Rochester, N.Y.: University of Rochester Press, 1911). 2. Deborah Gray White,

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2017

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