"We didn't have any other place to live": Residential Patterns in Segregated Arlington County, Virginia

"We didn't have any other place to live": Residential Patterns in Segregated Arlington County,... Abstract: Using established theories of neighborhood selection as a theoretical framework, as well as qualitative and quantitative methods and mixed data sources, this paper documents a study exploring the residential patterns of African Americans living in Arlington, Virginia, during Segregation (1900-1970). A southern town bordering Washington, D.C., Arlington has been home to African Americans since slaves first worked the tobacco farms in the 1600s. During the period when black neighborhoods in Northern cities were inundated by southern, black migrants during the Great Migration, Arlington's farms and settlements, many of them integrated, were similarly inundated by white federal workers from across the Potomac River. Developers, the County, and the federal government each played a role in accelerating Arlington's transition from a collection of farms into a bustling white suburb with three highly segregated black neighborhoods. The study introduces a new procedure for aggregating manuscript census data for use with segregation indexes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southeastern Geographer University of North Carolina Press

"We didn't have any other place to live": Residential Patterns in Segregated Arlington County, Virginia

Southeastern Geographer, Volume 53 (4) – Dec 7, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Southeastern Division, Association of American Geographers.
ISSN
1549-6929
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Using established theories of neighborhood selection as a theoretical framework, as well as qualitative and quantitative methods and mixed data sources, this paper documents a study exploring the residential patterns of African Americans living in Arlington, Virginia, during Segregation (1900-1970). A southern town bordering Washington, D.C., Arlington has been home to African Americans since slaves first worked the tobacco farms in the 1600s. During the period when black neighborhoods in Northern cities were inundated by southern, black migrants during the Great Migration, Arlington's farms and settlements, many of them integrated, were similarly inundated by white federal workers from across the Potomac River. Developers, the County, and the federal government each played a role in accelerating Arlington's transition from a collection of farms into a bustling white suburb with three highly segregated black neighborhoods. The study introduces a new procedure for aggregating manuscript census data for use with segregation indexes.

Journal

Southeastern GeographerUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 7, 2013

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