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War upon Our Border: Two Ohio Valley Communities Navigate the Civil War by Stephen I. Rockenbach (review)

War upon Our Border: Two Ohio Valley Communities Navigate the Civil War by Stephen I. Rockenbach... from the war bound up with a regionalist consciousness and questions of race” (16), as evidenced by Jillian Spivey Caddell’s essay on a painting by Winslow Homer and the wartime fiction of Rebecca Harding Davis and Constance Fenimore Woolson, each associated with New England, and Kathleen Diffley’s investigation of fiction published during the 1860s in San Francisco’s Overland Monthly, a publication edited by Bret Harte and designed to challenge Boston’s cultural hegemony. This collection is well worth our time. At some level, we have a profes sional obligation to keep up with (or at least be aware of trends in) closely aligned disciplines. Beyond that, though, many of these essays have some- thing to say to the kind of work many of us are engaged in. Historians dur- ing the third quarter of the twentieth century understood the importance of reckoning with literary explorations of the war. So should we. Sarah E. Gardner sarah e. gardner, professor of history at Mercer University, is currently working on a book-length manuscript, “‘A New Glass to See All Our Old Things Through’: Reading during the American Civil War.” War upon Our Border: Two Ohio Valley Communities Navigate the Civil War. By Stephen http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

War upon Our Border: Two Ohio Valley Communities Navigate the Civil War by Stephen I. Rockenbach (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 7 (4) – Oct 31, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

from the war bound up with a regionalist consciousness and questions of race” (16), as evidenced by Jillian Spivey Caddell’s essay on a painting by Winslow Homer and the wartime fiction of Rebecca Harding Davis and Constance Fenimore Woolson, each associated with New England, and Kathleen Diffley’s investigation of fiction published during the 1860s in San Francisco’s Overland Monthly, a publication edited by Bret Harte and designed to challenge Boston’s cultural hegemony. This collection is well worth our time. At some level, we have a profes sional obligation to keep up with (or at least be aware of trends in) closely aligned disciplines. Beyond that, though, many of these essays have some- thing to say to the kind of work many of us are engaged in. Historians dur- ing the third quarter of the twentieth century understood the importance of reckoning with literary explorations of the war. So should we. Sarah E. Gardner sarah e. gardner, professor of history at Mercer University, is currently working on a book-length manuscript, “‘A New Glass to See All Our Old Things Through’: Reading during the American Civil War.” War upon Our Border: Two Ohio Valley Communities Navigate the Civil War. By Stephen

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2017

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