Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

War Stuff: The Struggle for Human and Environmental Resources in the American Civil War by Joan E. Cashin (review)

War Stuff: The Struggle for Human and Environmental Resources in the American Civil War by Joan... Civil War,” he asserts (12). Moreover, the attitudes of individual soldiers were moving targets. “To persevere,” he writes, “soldiers were continually remaking themselves” (10). Carmichael seems to be saying that since it is impossible for historians to capture in a meaningful way the entirety of Civil War soldiers’ experiences, it is not worth trying. Carmichael respectfully engages other historians of Civil War soldiers, but he does not necessarily replace any of them. More than most books on the Civil War era, The War for the Common Soldier will win fans and earn criticism based on readers’ own interests and favored methodologies. It is not a straightforward account of the common soldier, and Carmichael’s use of evidence—which he lays out clearly and confidently—will not be everyone’s cup of tea. It is probably too idiosyncratic to become the basic account of Civil War soldiers for this generation. But it does enrich our knowledge and challenge previous approaches, which is one of the roles of serious scholarship. And it will reward anyone who brings to it an open mind and a willingness to accept ambiguity over certainty, and who can appreciate the power of narrative to help us under- stand the past. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

War Stuff: The Struggle for Human and Environmental Resources in the American Civil War by Joan E. Cashin (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 9 (4) – Dec 5, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/war-stuff-the-struggle-for-human-and-environmental-resources-in-the-ybppiDlawa
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Civil War,” he asserts (12). Moreover, the attitudes of individual soldiers were moving targets. “To persevere,” he writes, “soldiers were continually remaking themselves” (10). Carmichael seems to be saying that since it is impossible for historians to capture in a meaningful way the entirety of Civil War soldiers’ experiences, it is not worth trying. Carmichael respectfully engages other historians of Civil War soldiers, but he does not necessarily replace any of them. More than most books on the Civil War era, The War for the Common Soldier will win fans and earn criticism based on readers’ own interests and favored methodologies. It is not a straightforward account of the common soldier, and Carmichael’s use of evidence—which he lays out clearly and confidently—will not be everyone’s cup of tea. It is probably too idiosyncratic to become the basic account of Civil War soldiers for this generation. But it does enrich our knowledge and challenge previous approaches, which is one of the roles of serious scholarship. And it will reward anyone who brings to it an open mind and a willingness to accept ambiguity over certainty, and who can appreciate the power of narrative to help us under- stand the past.

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 5, 2019

There are no references for this article.