Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Visualizing Equality: African American Rights and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century by Aston Gonzalez (review)

Visualizing Equality: African American Rights and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century by... community was not the kind of fixed settlement associated with the most extreme form of grand marronage; it was a network of small bands who lived in “multiple semipermanent settlements” (6). Further muddying the waters, at one point Nevius characterizes an unsupervised shingle- producing slave camp in the swamp as “essentially a maroon camp under the most limited of indirect oversight” by the company operating it (37). These difficult-to-categorize features of enslavement and resistance in the Dismal fit more comfortably in Neil Roberts’s roomier paradigm of mar - ronage as movement toward autonomy, as Nevius acknowledges on the final page. Thus, readers of City of Refuge would profit by first reading Roberts’s Freedom as Marronage (2015) for an analytical lens. City of Refuge’s detailed examination of the Dismal Swamp’s business and labor history, as well as its glimpses of maroons, adds to the underde- veloped field of marronage in North America. Although the book is slim, it is more appropriate for researchers than students. Those seeking an overview of marronage in North America can turn to Sylviane A. Diouf ’s Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons (2014). For researchers who need a detailed account of enterprises in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Visualizing Equality: African American Rights and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century by Aston Gonzalez (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 11 (3) – Sep 1, 2021

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/visualizing-equality-african-american-rights-and-visual-culture-in-the-G7f8pS0PT0
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

community was not the kind of fixed settlement associated with the most extreme form of grand marronage; it was a network of small bands who lived in “multiple semipermanent settlements” (6). Further muddying the waters, at one point Nevius characterizes an unsupervised shingle- producing slave camp in the swamp as “essentially a maroon camp under the most limited of indirect oversight” by the company operating it (37). These difficult-to-categorize features of enslavement and resistance in the Dismal fit more comfortably in Neil Roberts’s roomier paradigm of mar - ronage as movement toward autonomy, as Nevius acknowledges on the final page. Thus, readers of City of Refuge would profit by first reading Roberts’s Freedom as Marronage (2015) for an analytical lens. City of Refuge’s detailed examination of the Dismal Swamp’s business and labor history, as well as its glimpses of maroons, adds to the underde- veloped field of marronage in North America. Although the book is slim, it is more appropriate for researchers than students. Those seeking an overview of marronage in North America can turn to Sylviane A. Diouf ’s Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons (2014). For researchers who need a detailed account of enterprises in

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Sep 1, 2021

There are no references for this article.