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Use of Ethical Dilemmas to Contribute to the Knowledge and Behavior of High School Students

Use of Ethical Dilemmas to Contribute to the Knowledge and Behavior of High School Students Annette Vincent, Ph.D. Melanie Meche, M.Ed. University of Louisiana, Lafayette In the educational environment, there is increasing interest in the teaching of ethics. At one time teaching was teaching ethics. Ethics was taught through literature, history, and other courses where applicable. Today, there is diminishing influence of churches and families in instilling ethical values in our youth, causing widespread decline in ethical standards. This decline creates a need for attention to ethics education, leading to attempts by educational systems to teach ethics in the academic environment. The following are examples of the movement toward including ethics education in the curriculum. Ethics in the Curriculum There have been efforts to integrate ethics into the K-12 curriculum. For instance, the Kenan Ethics Program, Ethics Across the Curriculum, supports innovation in the teaching of ethics and the integration of moral inquiry across the curriculum. Projects in the program have included the development of an environmental justice module focused on childhood exposure for a required course in Environmental Sciences, a faculty seminar to evaluate and revise the ethics curriculum in the Sanford Institute of Public Policy, and a practical ethics initiative in the Department of Religion (Kenan Ethics Across the Curriculum, 1999). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Use of Ethical Dilemmas to Contribute to the Knowledge and Behavior of High School Students

The High School Journal , Volume 84 (4) – May 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
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Abstract

Annette Vincent, Ph.D. Melanie Meche, M.Ed. University of Louisiana, Lafayette In the educational environment, there is increasing interest in the teaching of ethics. At one time teaching was teaching ethics. Ethics was taught through literature, history, and other courses where applicable. Today, there is diminishing influence of churches and families in instilling ethical values in our youth, causing widespread decline in ethical standards. This decline creates a need for attention to ethics education, leading to attempts by educational systems to teach ethics in the academic environment. The following are examples of the movement toward including ethics education in the curriculum. Ethics in the Curriculum There have been efforts to integrate ethics into the K-12 curriculum. For instance, the Kenan Ethics Program, Ethics Across the Curriculum, supports innovation in the teaching of ethics and the integration of moral inquiry across the curriculum. Projects in the program have included the development of an environmental justice module focused on childhood exposure for a required course in Environmental Sciences, a faculty seminar to evaluate and revise the ethics curriculum in the Sanford Institute of Public Policy, and a practical ethics initiative in the Department of Religion (Kenan Ethics Across the Curriculum, 1999).

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 1, 2001

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