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Upon the Fields of Battle: Essays on the Military History of America's Civil War ed. by Andrew S. Bledsoe and Andrew F. Lang (review)

Upon the Fields of Battle: Essays on the Military History of America's Civil War ed. by... reconstruction and remembrance. In her hands, the boundaries between war and peace, slavery and freedom blur in provocative yet satisfying ways. The bricolage of things that African American families used to construct their homes was testimony to the ways in which their enslaved life came with them into freedom, providing memories both painful and pleasing. In the same way, the essays by Lisa Brady and Timothy Silver, Peter Carmichael, and Yael Sternhell prove that a material culture approach can illuminate how arbitrary the “end of war” is as a chronological marker. Despite the surrender at Appomattox, the war endured not only in mem- ory, but in the acquisition and loss of material things that gave the war an afterlife of many generations—a fact that we still see writ large in the con- troversy over statues, plaques, and Confederate flags. These essays demon - strate how objects sustain wars long after the soldiers leave the field. I wish that there had been at least one more contribution that could have turned our attention to how such a dynamic might have functioned when it comes to the Civil War history of Native Americans. As advocates for a material culture approach to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Upon the Fields of Battle: Essays on the Military History of America's Civil War ed. by Andrew S. Bledsoe and Andrew F. Lang (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 9 (4) – Dec 5, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

reconstruction and remembrance. In her hands, the boundaries between war and peace, slavery and freedom blur in provocative yet satisfying ways. The bricolage of things that African American families used to construct their homes was testimony to the ways in which their enslaved life came with them into freedom, providing memories both painful and pleasing. In the same way, the essays by Lisa Brady and Timothy Silver, Peter Carmichael, and Yael Sternhell prove that a material culture approach can illuminate how arbitrary the “end of war” is as a chronological marker. Despite the surrender at Appomattox, the war endured not only in mem- ory, but in the acquisition and loss of material things that gave the war an afterlife of many generations—a fact that we still see writ large in the con- troversy over statues, plaques, and Confederate flags. These essays demon - strate how objects sustain wars long after the soldiers leave the field. I wish that there had been at least one more contribution that could have turned our attention to how such a dynamic might have functioned when it comes to the Civil War history of Native Americans. As advocates for a material culture approach to

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 5, 2019

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