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Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery by Calvin Schermerhorn (review)

Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery by Calvin Schermerhorn (review) struggled with religious faith as a teenager and young man because his brother had drowned on the Sabbath and the Calvinist funeral sermon condemned him to hell, which Grasso does not mention, but he does treat the public Christianity Mann used to help promote the common school idea, which Mann derived from Channing. The Swedenborgian Church, Freemasonry, and the African Methodist Episcopal Church sprang from the same Protestant root as the rest, but although Grasso acknowledges the discrimination that drove the Reverend Richard Allen and other black Methodists to start their new church, he does not examine the theology behind antiblack prejudice. Instead, he draws material on black skepti- cism from Christopher Cameron’s Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism (2019). He also misreads a piece of evidence he includes in an endnote. The primary source is Benjamin Rush’s description of free blacks in Philadelphia: “A majority of them are ignorant unknown to any religious society” (536n51). Grasso describes them as “totally ‘igno- rant’ of religion,” a very different claim (146). Such is the distortion a false polarity made by one fixed point creates. This compendium of conversations provides extended close readings of a multitude of primary sources http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery by Calvin Schermerhorn (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 9 (3) – Sep 3, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

struggled with religious faith as a teenager and young man because his brother had drowned on the Sabbath and the Calvinist funeral sermon condemned him to hell, which Grasso does not mention, but he does treat the public Christianity Mann used to help promote the common school idea, which Mann derived from Channing. The Swedenborgian Church, Freemasonry, and the African Methodist Episcopal Church sprang from the same Protestant root as the rest, but although Grasso acknowledges the discrimination that drove the Reverend Richard Allen and other black Methodists to start their new church, he does not examine the theology behind antiblack prejudice. Instead, he draws material on black skepti- cism from Christopher Cameron’s Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism (2019). He also misreads a piece of evidence he includes in an endnote. The primary source is Benjamin Rush’s description of free blacks in Philadelphia: “A majority of them are ignorant unknown to any religious society” (536n51). Grasso describes them as “totally ‘igno- rant’ of religion,” a very different claim (146). Such is the distortion a false polarity made by one fixed point creates. This compendium of conversations provides extended close readings of a multitude of primary sources

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Sep 3, 2019

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