Turning the Tide: College Football and Southern Progressivism

Turning the Tide: College Football and Southern Progressivism ESSAY Turning the Tide College Football and Southern Progressivism by Andrew Doyle he southern poet and critic Donald Davidson asserted that the South of die 1920s "disproved the axiom that two bodies cannot occupy the same space."1 An emerging urban society built upon the secular gospel of progress and innovation coexisted uneasily with an agrarian society wedded to a more traditional value system. The fondest dreams of an earlier generation of New South boost- ers reached at least partial fruition during that decade. Rapid economic growth over the previous half century had extended industrial capitalism, mass culture, and the ethos of consumerism into a region still largely rooted in the mores of a rural folk culture and conservative evangelical Protestantism. While the southern commitment to sectional reconciliation on northern terms was irrevocable, the terms of this phase of the long surrender were hard for all but the most ardent of southern modernizers to swallow. The Soudi of the 1920s was moving inexorably closer to the American cultural and economic mainstream, but the rise of reli- gious fundamentalism, the revival of the Ku Klux Klan, and the increasing intensity of sectional hostility revealed the profound misgivings with which white http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Turning the Tide: College Football and Southern Progressivism

Southern Cultures, Volume 3 (3) – Jan 4, 1997

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

ESSAY Turning the Tide College Football and Southern Progressivism by Andrew Doyle he southern poet and critic Donald Davidson asserted that the South of die 1920s "disproved the axiom that two bodies cannot occupy the same space."1 An emerging urban society built upon the secular gospel of progress and innovation coexisted uneasily with an agrarian society wedded to a more traditional value system. The fondest dreams of an earlier generation of New South boost- ers reached at least partial fruition during that decade. Rapid economic growth over the previous half century had extended industrial capitalism, mass culture, and the ethos of consumerism into a region still largely rooted in the mores of a rural folk culture and conservative evangelical Protestantism. While the southern commitment to sectional reconciliation on northern terms was irrevocable, the terms of this phase of the long surrender were hard for all but the most ardent of southern modernizers to swallow. The Soudi of the 1920s was moving inexorably closer to the American cultural and economic mainstream, but the rise of reli- gious fundamentalism, the revival of the Ku Klux Klan, and the increasing intensity of sectional hostility revealed the profound misgivings with which white

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1997

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