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Trying to Get Appalachia Less Wrong: A Modest Approach

Trying to Get Appalachia Less Wrong: A Modest Approach Essay .................... Trying to Get Appalachia Less Wrong A Modest Approach by Elizabeth S. D. Engelhardt The quiet presence of the mountains testifies that telling shortened and simplified stories of Appalachian people, places, and cultures might prove tricky. Few mountain ranges on the planet are older, have borne witness to more history, and have endured through more seasons of change. All photos courtesy of Roger May. hen the editors of Southern Cultures asked me to guest edit a special issue on Appalachia, I said yes immediately. Not only is western North Carolina my family home, but Appalachian Studies is my most long-standing scholarly home. Literature, music, food, art, entrepreneurship, and scholarship from and about Appalachia are energetic, diverse, robust, and prolific right now--and they have long been so. I am thrilled and honored to have helped create this issue you hold in your hands. At the same time, when we began this process, my breath caught in my throat a bit. Because here's what I also know: everyone who has thought they could explain Appalachia--its places, people, or cultures--has gotten it wrong. Every ten years or so, Appalachia's people and culture figure in a national or international discussion--more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Trying to Get Appalachia Less Wrong: A Modest Approach

Southern Cultures , Volume 23 (1) – Apr 16, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Essay .................... Trying to Get Appalachia Less Wrong A Modest Approach by Elizabeth S. D. Engelhardt The quiet presence of the mountains testifies that telling shortened and simplified stories of Appalachian people, places, and cultures might prove tricky. Few mountain ranges on the planet are older, have borne witness to more history, and have endured through more seasons of change. All photos courtesy of Roger May. hen the editors of Southern Cultures asked me to guest edit a special issue on Appalachia, I said yes immediately. Not only is western North Carolina my family home, but Appalachian Studies is my most long-standing scholarly home. Literature, music, food, art, entrepreneurship, and scholarship from and about Appalachia are energetic, diverse, robust, and prolific right now--and they have long been so. I am thrilled and honored to have helped create this issue you hold in your hands. At the same time, when we began this process, my breath caught in my throat a bit. Because here's what I also know: everyone who has thought they could explain Appalachia--its places, people, or cultures--has gotten it wrong. Every ten years or so, Appalachia's people and culture figure in a national or international discussion--more

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Apr 16, 2017

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