Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Translating Interdisciplinarity: Reading Martí Reading Whitman

Translating Interdisciplinarity: Reading Martí Reading Whitman a l Fre D J. l ópe z Translating Interdisciplinarity Reading Martí Reading Whitman I see the superior oceans and the inferior ones, the Atlantic and Pacic fi , the sea of Mexico, the Brazilian sea, and the sea of Peru. . . . I see the Brazilian vaquero, I see the Bolivian ascending mount Sorata, I see the Wacho crossing the plains, I see the incomparable rider of horses with his lasso on his arm, I see over the pampas the pursuit of wild cattle for their hides. Walt Whitman, “Salut au monde!”1 [Whitman] seldom read any book deliberately through, and there was no more (apparent) system about his reading than in anything else that he did; that is to say, there was no system about it at all. If he sat in the library an hour, he would have half a dozen to a dozen volumes about him, on the table, on chairs and on the floor. He seemed to read a few pages here and a few pages there, and pass from place to place, from volume to volume, doubtless pursuing some clue or thread of his own. Sometimes (though very seldom) he would get sufficiently http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Translating Interdisciplinarity: Reading Martí Reading Whitman

The Comparatist , Volume 35 – Jun 15, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/translating-interdisciplinarity-reading-mart-reading-whitman-ZAge7LtObu
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

a l Fre D J. l ópe z Translating Interdisciplinarity Reading Martí Reading Whitman I see the superior oceans and the inferior ones, the Atlantic and Pacic fi , the sea of Mexico, the Brazilian sea, and the sea of Peru. . . . I see the Brazilian vaquero, I see the Bolivian ascending mount Sorata, I see the Wacho crossing the plains, I see the incomparable rider of horses with his lasso on his arm, I see over the pampas the pursuit of wild cattle for their hides. Walt Whitman, “Salut au monde!”1 [Whitman] seldom read any book deliberately through, and there was no more (apparent) system about his reading than in anything else that he did; that is to say, there was no system about it at all. If he sat in the library an hour, he would have half a dozen to a dozen volumes about him, on the table, on chairs and on the floor. He seemed to read a few pages here and a few pages there, and pass from place to place, from volume to volume, doubtless pursuing some clue or thread of his own. Sometimes (though very seldom) he would get sufficiently

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 15, 2011

There are no references for this article.