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Transculturality and the Gesta Romanorum in Light of Hartmann von Aue's Gregorius and Heinrich Kaufringer's Verse Narratives

Transculturality and the Gesta Romanorum in Light of Hartmann von Aue's Gregorius and Heinrich... Albrecht Classen in Light of Hartmann von Aue’s Gregorius and Heinrich Kaufringer’s Verse Narratives We have long recognized the enormous literary productivity of the genre of late medieval verse narratives. Wherever we look, we discover significant processes of reception, translation, adaptation, and modeling of older sources for the own purposes. Marie de France, in her lais (ca. 1180–1190) indicates that she could have drawn from Latin sources, but that she preferred utilizing ancient Breton folk tales. Geoffrey Chaucer in his Canterbury Tales (ca. 1400) drew freely from Boccaccio’s Decameron (ca. 1351), among many other sources. Those also included the rich corpus of fabliaux, twelfth- and thirteenth-­ entury Old French ribald verse narc ratives that enjoyed great popularity all over Europe far into the early modern age. In the middle of the sixteenth century, Marguerite de Navarre explicitly referred to the French translation of Boccaccio’s Decameron when she composed her own collection of prose narratives, her Heptaméron. The rich corpus of German mæren from the thirteenth to the fifteenth centuries, subsequently followed by the vast number of Schwänke (entertaining, but often also didactic prose narratives), was certainly influenced by Boccaccio’s work as well, and then by Poggio Bracciolini’s Facetiae http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Transculturality and the Gesta Romanorum in Light of Hartmann von Aue's Gregorius and Heinrich Kaufringer's Verse Narratives

The Comparatist , Volume 41 – Nov 1, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
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Abstract

Albrecht Classen in Light of Hartmann von Aue’s Gregorius and Heinrich Kaufringer’s Verse Narratives We have long recognized the enormous literary productivity of the genre of late medieval verse narratives. Wherever we look, we discover significant processes of reception, translation, adaptation, and modeling of older sources for the own purposes. Marie de France, in her lais (ca. 1180–1190) indicates that she could have drawn from Latin sources, but that she preferred utilizing ancient Breton folk tales. Geoffrey Chaucer in his Canterbury Tales (ca. 1400) drew freely from Boccaccio’s Decameron (ca. 1351), among many other sources. Those also included the rich corpus of fabliaux, twelfth- and thirteenth-­ entury Old French ribald verse narc ratives that enjoyed great popularity all over Europe far into the early modern age. In the middle of the sixteenth century, Marguerite de Navarre explicitly referred to the French translation of Boccaccio’s Decameron when she composed her own collection of prose narratives, her Heptaméron. The rich corpus of German mæren from the thirteenth to the fifteenth centuries, subsequently followed by the vast number of Schwänke (entertaining, but often also didactic prose narratives), was certainly influenced by Boccaccio’s work as well, and then by Poggio Bracciolini’s Facetiae

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 1, 2017

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