Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children (review)

Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children (review) represents the most complete community-based study of how Confederate veteran families adjusted in the postwar South. McClurken acknowledges the limits of his sources and samples, and he does not overstep or overgeneralize. Unfortunately, this sometimes leaves the reader desiring more. Did local elites, who like William Sutherlin managed to maintain their wealth and status through the war, assist Confederate veterans and their families? How did denominations other than the Baptists respond to the increased need for fi nancial and emo- tional support? At the same time, there are areas where a broader context would have been valuable. How did Pittsylvania County and Virginia com- pare with other Confederate states in terms of pensions for former soldiers and their widows, aid for amputees, state mental institutions, and soldiers’ homes? McClurken acknowledges that his is not a complete history of Confederate veteran families but is instead a starting point for the study of southern welfare. Historians would do well to follow McClurken’s model. Sharon A. Roger Hepburn sharon a . roger hepburn, professor and chair of the Department of History at Radford University in Virginia, is the author of Crossing the Border: A Free Black Community in Canada (University of Illinois http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (4) – Nov 17, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/topsy-turvy-how-the-civil-war-turned-the-world-upside-down-for-t1AOPYtgU6
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

represents the most complete community-based study of how Confederate veteran families adjusted in the postwar South. McClurken acknowledges the limits of his sources and samples, and he does not overstep or overgeneralize. Unfortunately, this sometimes leaves the reader desiring more. Did local elites, who like William Sutherlin managed to maintain their wealth and status through the war, assist Confederate veterans and their families? How did denominations other than the Baptists respond to the increased need for fi nancial and emo- tional support? At the same time, there are areas where a broader context would have been valuable. How did Pittsylvania County and Virginia com- pare with other Confederate states in terms of pensions for former soldiers and their widows, aid for amputees, state mental institutions, and soldiers’ homes? McClurken acknowledges that his is not a complete history of Confederate veteran families but is instead a starting point for the study of southern welfare. Historians would do well to follow McClurken’s model. Sharon A. Roger Hepburn sharon a . roger hepburn, professor and chair of the Department of History at Radford University in Virginia, is the author of Crossing the Border: A Free Black Community in Canada (University of Illinois

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2011

There are no references for this article.