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Tocqueville on America after 1840: Letters and Other Writings (review)

Tocqueville on America after 1840: Letters and Other Writings (review) book revi ews Tocqueville on America after 1840: Letters and Other Writings. Edited and translated by Aurelian Craiutu and Jeremy Jennings. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. 576. Cloth, $104.00; paper, $32.99.) Tocqueville in America after 1840 is a compilation of documents illu- minating Alexis de Tocqueville’s attitudes toward and ties to the United States during the last two decades of his life. Tocqueville scholars Aurelian Craiutu and Jeremy Jennings edit (and sometimes translate) these post– Democracy in America documents with care and explanatory helpfulness. Although Tocqueville’s ideas are more richly presented in sections on his public writings and speeches, the largest section highlights Tocqueville’s correspondence with Americans that emphasizes the Frenchman’s steady kind helpfulness to Americans and his unfl agging interest in the nation he saw as the best exemplar of democracy. These documents often deal with insignifi cant matters, but they enrich our understanding of Tocqueville’s views. Especially strong is his detestation of the “horrible plague” of slav- ery, whose extension anywhere was, according to Tocqueville, “an unpar- donable crime against humanity” (224). Tocqueville accepted the national compromise of permitting slave states their favored institution, but, like the Republicans of the 1850s, he labeled slavery’s expansion an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Tocqueville on America after 1840: Letters and Other Writings (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (4) – Nov 17, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

book revi ews Tocqueville on America after 1840: Letters and Other Writings. Edited and translated by Aurelian Craiutu and Jeremy Jennings. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. 576. Cloth, $104.00; paper, $32.99.) Tocqueville in America after 1840 is a compilation of documents illu- minating Alexis de Tocqueville’s attitudes toward and ties to the United States during the last two decades of his life. Tocqueville scholars Aurelian Craiutu and Jeremy Jennings edit (and sometimes translate) these post– Democracy in America documents with care and explanatory helpfulness. Although Tocqueville’s ideas are more richly presented in sections on his public writings and speeches, the largest section highlights Tocqueville’s correspondence with Americans that emphasizes the Frenchman’s steady kind helpfulness to Americans and his unfl agging interest in the nation he saw as the best exemplar of democracy. These documents often deal with insignifi cant matters, but they enrich our understanding of Tocqueville’s views. Especially strong is his detestation of the “horrible plague” of slav- ery, whose extension anywhere was, according to Tocqueville, “an unpar- donable crime against humanity” (224). Tocqueville accepted the national compromise of permitting slave states their favored institution, but, like the Republicans of the 1850s, he labeled slavery’s expansion an

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2011

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