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“To Plant Me in Mine Own Inheritance”: Prolepsis and Pretenders in John Ford’s Perkin Warbeck

“To Plant Me in Mine Own Inheritance”: Prolepsis and Pretenders in John Ford’s Perkin Warbeck <p>Abstract:</p><p>This article investigates John Ford’s use of mixed temporality to stage succession in <i>Perkin Warbeck</i>. Although Perkin aspires to be planted in his “own inheritance” and ascend to the throne, Ford’s play first entertains and then dismisses the aspirations of this pretender. I argue that Ford’s pretender plot is equally about the past and the future. The play represents both history as it unfolded and the possible counterfactual projected by Perkin’s desired succession. I show that Ford’s <i>Perkin Warbeck</i>, instead of revealing the limits of the history play, celebrates the affordances of the genre. These brief, dramatized chronicles bring pasts, presents, and futures to life on the stage.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in Philology University of North Carolina Press

“To Plant Me in Mine Own Inheritance”: Prolepsis and Pretenders in John Ford’s Perkin Warbeck

Studies in Philology , Volume 115 (3) – Jun 29, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1543-0383

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This article investigates John Ford’s use of mixed temporality to stage succession in <i>Perkin Warbeck</i>. Although Perkin aspires to be planted in his “own inheritance” and ascend to the throne, Ford’s play first entertains and then dismisses the aspirations of this pretender. I argue that Ford’s pretender plot is equally about the past and the future. The play represents both history as it unfolded and the possible counterfactual projected by Perkin’s desired succession. I show that Ford’s <i>Perkin Warbeck</i>, instead of revealing the limits of the history play, celebrates the affordances of the genre. These brief, dramatized chronicles bring pasts, presents, and futures to life on the stage.</p>

Journal

Studies in PhilologyUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 29, 2018

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