“Thus I restles rest in Spayne”: Engaging Empire in the Poetry of Sir Thomas Wyatt and Garcilaso de la Vega

“Thus I restles rest in Spayne”: Engaging Empire in the Poetry of Sir Thomas Wyatt and... by Joel B. Davis heEnglishpoetSirThomasWyatt(ca.1503­42)andhiscontemporary,theCastilianpoetGarcilasodelavega(1501?­36),shared somuchincommonandplayedsuchimportantrolesinthedevelopmentofpoetryintheirrespectivelanguagesthatthelackofcomparativestudiesoftheirpoetryissurprising.Inthearticlethatfollows, Icompareafewpoemsofsimilarthemesanddatesfromeachwriterto suggestthatWyatt'spoetryismorethoroughlyPetrarchan--andmore successfully so--than has been generally recognized. Placing Wyatt's poetryinthecontextofCharlesv'scourtandalongsidethepoetryof GarcilasorevealsthatWyatt'spoemsappropriatePetrarchanstrategies in a struggle to establish a unified lyric voice and to resist what we mightlooselycalldiscursivecolonization:forwhiletheflexible,indeed almost protean qualities of Petrarchism invited poets like Wyatt and Garcilaso to experiment in their native languages, the same qualities madePetrarchismanaptvehicleforimaginingtheimperialambitions ofCharlesv.ComparingWyatt'spoetrytothatofGarcilasodelavega reveals that a discursive resistance to the imperialism of Charles v's courtisinflectedbythedifferencebetweenthetwopoets'relationships to that court--with significant consequences for the development of PetrarchanpoetryintheEnglishandCastilianvernaculars. BothWyattandGarcilasoflourishedinthesixteenth-centuryrevival of Petrarchism, each is credited with introducing Italian Renaissance innovationsintohisownvernacularliterature,andweknowthatthe 493 ©2010TheUniversityofNorthCarolinaPress Engaging Empire in Wyatt and Garcilaso twosharedcommoninfluencesinPetrarch,LuigiAlamanni,Baldesare Castiglione,PietroBembo,andothers.Bothmenwereembroiledinthe struggle for supremacy over the Mediterranean basin fought among Charlesv,FrancisI,andtheOttomanEmperorSuleimanII.Garcilaso hadservedCharlesvagainsttheforcesofSuleimanIIatthesiegeof viennain1529;hewaswoundedinCharlesv'sretakingofTunisfrom OttomanforcesunderthecommandofKhairadDin,thefearedBarbarossa,in1535;andhediedOctober14,1536fromaheadwoundsufferedatLeMuy,whilefightingtheforcesofFrancisI.Wyatthadbeena memberofHenryvIII'sembassytoFrancetodiscussaleagueagainst Charles v in 1526; he was part of another embassy to Pope ClementvIIin1527,justbeforeCharlesv'ssoldierssackedRome;hewas HenryvIII'sambassadortotheimperialcourtfromjune1537through june 1539 and again from December 1539 through May 1540; and he diedofexhaustionandaconsequentillnessastheresultofahardride fromLondontoFalmouthtomeetCharlesv'semissarytoEnglandon October11,1542. Garcilaso and Wyatt share in common more than hard service to demanding monarchs. Each man's life and career depended on the constant negotiations, alliances, betrayals, and battles through which Charlesv,FrancisI,andSuleimanIIstruggledtocontrolthewestern Mediterranean. Garcilaso found himself at various times early in his careeronbothsidesofCharlesv'sstruggletobringSpainunderHapsburg rule, especially during the revolt of the comuneros in 1521.1 The emperor's need to control his http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in Philology University of North Carolina Press

“Thus I restles rest in Spayne”: Engaging Empire in the Poetry of Sir Thomas Wyatt and Garcilaso de la Vega

Studies in Philology, Volume 107 (4) – Oct 16, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/thus-i-restles-rest-in-spayne-engaging-empire-in-the-poetry-of-sir-EyAjCRv1Si
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
1543-0383
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

by Joel B. Davis heEnglishpoetSirThomasWyatt(ca.1503­42)andhiscontemporary,theCastilianpoetGarcilasodelavega(1501?­36),shared somuchincommonandplayedsuchimportantrolesinthedevelopmentofpoetryintheirrespectivelanguagesthatthelackofcomparativestudiesoftheirpoetryissurprising.Inthearticlethatfollows, Icompareafewpoemsofsimilarthemesanddatesfromeachwriterto suggestthatWyatt'spoetryismorethoroughlyPetrarchan--andmore successfully so--than has been generally recognized. Placing Wyatt's poetryinthecontextofCharlesv'scourtandalongsidethepoetryof GarcilasorevealsthatWyatt'spoemsappropriatePetrarchanstrategies in a struggle to establish a unified lyric voice and to resist what we mightlooselycalldiscursivecolonization:forwhiletheflexible,indeed almost protean qualities of Petrarchism invited poets like Wyatt and Garcilaso to experiment in their native languages, the same qualities madePetrarchismanaptvehicleforimaginingtheimperialambitions ofCharlesv.ComparingWyatt'spoetrytothatofGarcilasodelavega reveals that a discursive resistance to the imperialism of Charles v's courtisinflectedbythedifferencebetweenthetwopoets'relationships to that court--with significant consequences for the development of PetrarchanpoetryintheEnglishandCastilianvernaculars. BothWyattandGarcilasoflourishedinthesixteenth-centuryrevival of Petrarchism, each is credited with introducing Italian Renaissance innovationsintohisownvernacularliterature,andweknowthatthe 493 ©2010TheUniversityofNorthCarolinaPress Engaging Empire in Wyatt and Garcilaso twosharedcommoninfluencesinPetrarch,LuigiAlamanni,Baldesare Castiglione,PietroBembo,andothers.Bothmenwereembroiledinthe struggle for supremacy over the Mediterranean basin fought among Charlesv,FrancisI,andtheOttomanEmperorSuleimanII.Garcilaso hadservedCharlesvagainsttheforcesofSuleimanIIatthesiegeof viennain1529;hewaswoundedinCharlesv'sretakingofTunisfrom OttomanforcesunderthecommandofKhairadDin,thefearedBarbarossa,in1535;andhediedOctober14,1536fromaheadwoundsufferedatLeMuy,whilefightingtheforcesofFrancisI.Wyatthadbeena memberofHenryvIII'sembassytoFrancetodiscussaleagueagainst Charles v in 1526; he was part of another embassy to Pope ClementvIIin1527,justbeforeCharlesv'ssoldierssackedRome;hewas HenryvIII'sambassadortotheimperialcourtfromjune1537through june 1539 and again from December 1539 through May 1540; and he diedofexhaustionandaconsequentillnessastheresultofahardride fromLondontoFalmouthtomeetCharlesv'semissarytoEnglandon October11,1542. Garcilaso and Wyatt share in common more than hard service to demanding monarchs. Each man's life and career depended on the constant negotiations, alliances, betrayals, and battles through which Charlesv,FrancisI,andSuleimanIIstruggledtocontrolthewestern Mediterranean. Garcilaso found himself at various times early in his careeronbothsidesofCharlesv'sstruggletobringSpainunderHapsburg rule, especially during the revolt of the comuneros in 1521.1 The emperor's need to control his

Journal

Studies in PhilologyUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 16, 2010

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month