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Three Women and Their Men: Comparing Tagore's Bimala with James's Isabel and Forster's Lilia

Three Women and Their Men: Comparing Tagore's Bimala with James's Isabel and... Three Women and Their Men: Comparing Tagore's Bimala with James's Isabel and Forster's Lilia Amiya Bhushan Sharma The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 17-36 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0029 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414733/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries ??? COHVARATlsr THREE WOMEN AND THEIR MEN: COMPARING TAGORE'S BIMALA WITH JAMES'S ISABEL AND FORSTER'S LILIA Amiya Bhushan Sharma I. Aims and Methods It is not surprising that Goethe, with his idea of primordial unities—the Urpflanze, the vegetable form from which the other species would evolve —should have coined the word Weltliteratur. In India Rabindranath Ta- gore talked about visvasahitya ("universal literature") among a host of other world or universe related words. More recently, George Steiner, Oxford's foundation professor of comparative literature, stated in his 1994 inaugural address that "Weltliteratur seeks to articulate ideals, at- titudes of sensibility which belong to the universalizing civilities, to the international freemasonry of liberal spirits characteristic of the Enlight- enment" (146-47). Comparatists inquire into the core of the human con- dition, at a primordial level beneath culture and custom, religion and politics, even language and national tradition, so as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Three Women and Their Men: Comparing Tagore's Bimala with James's Isabel and Forster's Lilia

The Comparatist , Volume 26 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Three Women and Their Men: Comparing Tagore's Bimala with James's Isabel and Forster's Lilia Amiya Bhushan Sharma The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 17-36 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0029 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414733/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries ??? COHVARATlsr THREE WOMEN AND THEIR MEN: COMPARING TAGORE'S BIMALA WITH JAMES'S ISABEL AND FORSTER'S LILIA Amiya Bhushan Sharma I. Aims and Methods It is not surprising that Goethe, with his idea of primordial unities—the Urpflanze, the vegetable form from which the other species would evolve —should have coined the word Weltliteratur. In India Rabindranath Ta- gore talked about visvasahitya ("universal literature") among a host of other world or universe related words. More recently, George Steiner, Oxford's foundation professor of comparative literature, stated in his 1994 inaugural address that "Weltliteratur seeks to articulate ideals, at- titudes of sensibility which belong to the universalizing civilities, to the international freemasonry of liberal spirits characteristic of the Enlight- enment" (146-47). Comparatists inquire into the core of the human con- dition, at a primordial level beneath culture and custom, religion and politics, even language and national tradition, so as

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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