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The Unfinished Task of Grounding Reconstruction’s Promise

The Unfinished Task of Grounding Reconstruction’s Promise brook thomas The Unfinished Task of Grounding Reconstruction’s Promise Reconstruction’s promise certainly exceeded its accomplishments. Yet so long as Reconstruction survived, so did the possibility of change. . . . Its legacy deserves to survive as an inspiration to those Americans, black and white alike, who insist that the nation live up to the professed ideals of its political culture. —Eric Foner, 1982 In his introduction to a 2006 collection of essays reviewing recent schol- arship on Reconstruction, Thomas J. Brown begins: “Once likened to a dark and bloody ground, scholarship on Reconstruction now thrives less as a form of combat than as a collective building on a solid founda- tion.” Brown alludes to Bernard A. Weisberger’s award-winning 1959 essay regretting that, despite calls about twenty years earlier to change the course of Reconstruction study, “the indicated tide of revision has not fully set in.” Weisberger brings special attention to the failure of textbooks to incorporate new research and the lack of a synthesis to replace that of Claude Bowers’s popular 1929 The Tragic Era. In fact, the most recent synthesis was E. Merton Coulter’s 1947 old-fashioned The South during Reconstruction: 1865–1877. The conflict between new research and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Unfinished Task of Grounding Reconstruction’s Promise

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 7 (1) – Jan 26, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

brook thomas The Unfinished Task of Grounding Reconstruction’s Promise Reconstruction’s promise certainly exceeded its accomplishments. Yet so long as Reconstruction survived, so did the possibility of change. . . . Its legacy deserves to survive as an inspiration to those Americans, black and white alike, who insist that the nation live up to the professed ideals of its political culture. —Eric Foner, 1982 In his introduction to a 2006 collection of essays reviewing recent schol- arship on Reconstruction, Thomas J. Brown begins: “Once likened to a dark and bloody ground, scholarship on Reconstruction now thrives less as a form of combat than as a collective building on a solid founda- tion.” Brown alludes to Bernard A. Weisberger’s award-winning 1959 essay regretting that, despite calls about twenty years earlier to change the course of Reconstruction study, “the indicated tide of revision has not fully set in.” Weisberger brings special attention to the failure of textbooks to incorporate new research and the lack of a synthesis to replace that of Claude Bowers’s popular 1929 The Tragic Era. In fact, the most recent synthesis was E. Merton Coulter’s 1947 old-fashioned The South during Reconstruction: 1865–1877. The conflict between new research and the

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 26, 2017

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