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The Trial of Democracy Black Suffrage and Northern Republicans, 1860-1910 (review)

The Trial of Democracy Black Suffrage and Northern Republicans, 1860-1910 (review) arson during the 1820s, there is none for either the more immediate 1830s or the 1 840s. Bogger's portrait of Norfolk fiUs an important void in the scholarship on free blacks and offers valuable clues for understanding how free blacks in other communities lived "out of the shadows." The Trial of Democracy Black Suffrage and Northern RepubHcans, i860--1910 By Xi Wang University of Georgia Press, 1 997 480 pp. Cloth, $58 Reviewed by John David Smith, Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor in the department of history at North Carolina State University, where he teaches southern history, Civil War, and public history. His most recent publication is "This Wilderness of War'': The Civil War Letters of George W. Squier, Hoosier Volunteer (1 998), coedited widi Julie A. Doyle and Richard M. McMurry. Nothing is more fundamental to American democracy than the national protection of citizens' equal rights, especiaUy the right to vote. Though many things remained unsetded after the Civil War, the bloody conflict resolved at least three essential issues: legaHzed slavery no longer could exist; blacks no longer could be excluded from citizenship; and skin color no longer could be used to exclude males from the right to vote. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Trial of Democracy Black Suffrage and Northern Republicans, 1860-1910 (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 5 (1) – Jan 4, 1999

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

arson during the 1820s, there is none for either the more immediate 1830s or the 1 840s. Bogger's portrait of Norfolk fiUs an important void in the scholarship on free blacks and offers valuable clues for understanding how free blacks in other communities lived "out of the shadows." The Trial of Democracy Black Suffrage and Northern RepubHcans, i860--1910 By Xi Wang University of Georgia Press, 1 997 480 pp. Cloth, $58 Reviewed by John David Smith, Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor in the department of history at North Carolina State University, where he teaches southern history, Civil War, and public history. His most recent publication is "This Wilderness of War'': The Civil War Letters of George W. Squier, Hoosier Volunteer (1 998), coedited widi Julie A. Doyle and Richard M. McMurry. Nothing is more fundamental to American democracy than the national protection of citizens' equal rights, especiaUy the right to vote. Though many things remained unsetded after the Civil War, the bloody conflict resolved at least three essential issues: legaHzed slavery no longer could exist; blacks no longer could be excluded from citizenship; and skin color no longer could be used to exclude males from the right to vote.

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1999

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