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The Threshold of Manifest Destiny: Gender and National Expansion in Florida by Laurel Clark Shire (review)

The Threshold of Manifest Destiny: Gender and National Expansion in Florida by Laurel Clark Shire... Book Reviews { 821 Both the essay collection and Fenn’s supple narrative introduce us to the material world of Western Hemisphere space making in new and tangible ways. In their introduction, Barr and Countryman single out the Commerce Petroglyph, an indigenous map carved into rock along the shores of the Mississippi, as the operant image of their new historiographic method. Across the face of the cartographic stone, something called the “meander line”—probably a representation of the river’s constantly shifting course— draws us into the fluidity of vision in the indigenous natural world that collided violently with the antithetical ideology of Europeans, codified in destructive policies like Andrew Jackson’s Removal Act, which turned the living stream into a hard, bright line of imperial administration. It indeed seems time for us to write similar histories, finally embracing the fundamental “meander” that was the early American colonial landscape. phillip h. round   University of Iowa The Threshold of Manifest Destiny: Gender and National Expansion in Florida laurel clark shire Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016 288 pp. Laurel Clark Shire, an assistant professor of history at Western University, articulates an important argument in The Threshold of Manifest Destiny—scholars of gender and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

The Threshold of Manifest Destiny: Gender and National Expansion in Florida by Laurel Clark Shire (review)

Early American Literature , Volume 52 (3) – Oct 31, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-147X
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews { 821 Both the essay collection and Fenn’s supple narrative introduce us to the material world of Western Hemisphere space making in new and tangible ways. In their introduction, Barr and Countryman single out the Commerce Petroglyph, an indigenous map carved into rock along the shores of the Mississippi, as the operant image of their new historiographic method. Across the face of the cartographic stone, something called the “meander line”—probably a representation of the river’s constantly shifting course— draws us into the fluidity of vision in the indigenous natural world that collided violently with the antithetical ideology of Europeans, codified in destructive policies like Andrew Jackson’s Removal Act, which turned the living stream into a hard, bright line of imperial administration. It indeed seems time for us to write similar histories, finally embracing the fundamental “meander” that was the early American colonial landscape. phillip h. round   University of Iowa The Threshold of Manifest Destiny: Gender and National Expansion in Florida laurel clark shire Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016 288 pp. Laurel Clark Shire, an assistant professor of history at Western University, articulates an important argument in The Threshold of Manifest Destiny—scholars of gender and the

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2017

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