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The Slaveholding Crisis: Fear of Insurrection and the Coming of the Civil War by Carl Lawrence Paulus (review)

The Slaveholding Crisis: Fear of Insurrection and the Coming of the Civil War by Carl Lawrence... Worlds: Slavery, Region, and Nation in the Age of Progress (Oxford University Press, 2011) and is currently investigating how secession and the start of war played out internationally. The Slaveholding Crisis: Fear of Insurrection and the Coming of the Civil War. By Carl Lawrence Paulus. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017. Pp. 311. Cloth, $49.95.) Carl Paulus contends that white southerners from the 1790s to the 1860s were haunted by the possibility of slave insurrection. He starts by showing how deeply the Haitian Revolution stirred repercussions on the North American mainland. “Santo Domingo” signified a dreaded night mare of black rebels, slaughtered whites, and a world turned upside down. Paulus then moves ahead to revisit dozens of familiar handholds—Gabriel, the War of 1812, Denmark Vesey, David Walker, Nat Turner, Thomas R. Dew, emancipation in the British West Indies, immediate abolitionism, the postal campaign, the gag rule, James Henry Hammond’s and John C. Calhoun’s proslavery overtures, controversies about western territory, and the intensifying political snarl in the 1850s. Paulus harps constantly on a “planter elite” that exerted apparently unlimited power. Edmund Ruffin has a special appeal for Paulus. From 1856 through the war years, the colorful Virginia fire-eater with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Slaveholding Crisis: Fear of Insurrection and the Coming of the Civil War by Carl Lawrence Paulus (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 7 (4) – Oct 31, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Worlds: Slavery, Region, and Nation in the Age of Progress (Oxford University Press, 2011) and is currently investigating how secession and the start of war played out internationally. The Slaveholding Crisis: Fear of Insurrection and the Coming of the Civil War. By Carl Lawrence Paulus. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017. Pp. 311. Cloth, $49.95.) Carl Paulus contends that white southerners from the 1790s to the 1860s were haunted by the possibility of slave insurrection. He starts by showing how deeply the Haitian Revolution stirred repercussions on the North American mainland. “Santo Domingo” signified a dreaded night mare of black rebels, slaughtered whites, and a world turned upside down. Paulus then moves ahead to revisit dozens of familiar handholds—Gabriel, the War of 1812, Denmark Vesey, David Walker, Nat Turner, Thomas R. Dew, emancipation in the British West Indies, immediate abolitionism, the postal campaign, the gag rule, James Henry Hammond’s and John C. Calhoun’s proslavery overtures, controversies about western territory, and the intensifying political snarl in the 1850s. Paulus harps constantly on a “planter elite” that exerted apparently unlimited power. Edmund Ruffin has a special appeal for Paulus. From 1856 through the war years, the colorful Virginia fire-eater with

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2017

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